I have a stupid question about meals

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
I have a stupid question about meals
17
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 10:42am
I have a question about meals. I have the NJB cookbook which I have used a lot, but I don't like the idea of using bread as fillers and giving my family mainly water for beverages. A lot of junk food recipes in there too that I just don't feed to my family. (Such as the chocolate granola bars which is full of sugar and fat, and other things)The kids need milk, they need fruits and veggies and their protein. Do the people that feed their families so cheap eat a lot of bread to fill the kids up? Also, I like going to Aldi's but I find that there is so much junk food there. Yes, if you eat all that junk (chips, candy, cookies etc...) you can save a lot of money. I don't like a lot of canned food, it just doesn't taste very good to me so I don't save there either. I did buy their brand of Gogurt, their milk is a good price, but there isn't much else there that I would buy. At a regular grocery store I can find good produce, lots of nice fruit and veggies, a lot of times I buy my meat from Sam's Club if it looks good and is a good price. We eat a lot of chicken breast, ground turkey, pasta.

So, my question is to make a long story short...what is a typical snack for your family and a typical 3 meals a day and what do they drink?

Thank you! I need help, as a lot of you know, to lower my debt.

Jennifer(30)ft nursing student and wife and mother (Mike 34 Engineer, ft student and National Guard and runner), Jessica (6, Ballerina and T-Ball player), Justin(4.5 just my little cuddle bunny and pre-schooler)lol

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 11:04am
Personally we don't drink much milk. I know my kids get enough protein and calcium thru yougart, veggies, and cheese. I don't think milk particularly is an important point. Bread for fillers, maybe. I don't have NJB so can't judge, but what type of bread "filler" is it, grainwise? I think if it is complex carbs vs simple carbs is a better way to "judge" as a filler vs empty nutrition. Pasta can be just as bad as cheap white "filler" from Aldi's.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2002
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 11:10am
we try not to eat alot of junk food either like you i dont like canned veggies i prefer fresh but will settle for frozen.

keep in mind i'm pregnant so i'm a piggie right now LOL

but yesterday's menu was

8 am cereal milk toast and prenatals LOl when not pregnant i dont eat breakfast because i just can't stomach food that early normally

10 am banana and 16 oz water

11:30 fried fish, corn, salad and 16 oz water

2 pm orange 16 oz water

4 pm veggies *celery and tomatoes* dipped in ranch dressing 16 oz water

6 pm leftover fish corn salad and milk

8 pm apple & banana nut muffins 16 oz water

10 pm toast and 16 oz water

i dont use water as a filler i'm required to drink a ton that might expalin why i can't sleep due to pottying and yes i literally eat about every 2 hours all day so our grocery bill is higher then normal but i'm always hungry

chelle 23 dh larry 26 and bbay boy alex due sept 22nd

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 11:12am
LOL! But there's only two of you, not including your little one inside of you. So it's not so difficult to keep you grocery bill down.

Jennifer

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 11:15am
Yes, you're right. I don't know what kind of bread she suggests in the book she just suggests serving a lot of bread with the meal. We only eat whole wheat bread (which I buy from the bread store so it's a lot cheaper)and whole wheat pasta(which can be expensive.) You're right about the milk too. We do eat yogurt and some cheese too. But these can get expensive too.

Jennifer


Edited 8/21/2003 11:16:51 AM ET by jen_rn_2b

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2002
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 11:20am
i dont know about that i eat for 3 or 4 now just by myself *lol*

chelle 23 dh larry 26 and baby boy alex due sept 22nd

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Avatar for sarahfran
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 12:36pm
For our family, a typical three meals would be cereal for breakfast, leftovers for lunch (DH and me) or sandwich and fruit (for the kids), and dinner varies quite a bit. We try to do two meals a week that are chicken based, one that is hamburger based, one or two fish, one or two meatless, and one "alternate" meat (generally some part of a dead pig ;-), but occasionally another form of beef). All the meals include some form of carbohydrate--rice, pasta, bread, potato (nutritionally, there's very little difference, and a good whole wheat bread will certainly beat out pasta made with white flour any day as far as the nutrition goes)--and fresh veggies of some sort (although we do occasionally get lazy and make frozen veggies). DH and I drink milk and water, the kids have milk, water, and juice. For snacks, I usually give the kids fruit, yogurt, cheese-and-crackers, or pretzels/goldfish crackers. DH and I don't really snack, but when we feel like it, we break into the pretzels.

At Aldis, we buy their breakfast cereals, frozen juice concentrate, milk, bread, frozen ravioli, yogurt, applesauce, and chocolate chips. We do almost all of our other grocery shopping at Sam's Club, but we don't buy produce there since it tends to go bad before we can eat it all, except for bananas and apples. We get produce at a regular grocery store, as well as some specialty items for cooking (spices, ethnic foods, good cheeses, etc.).

I'm thinking now that maybe I shouldn't have answered this, since DH and I haven't cut our grocery budget to as bare-bones as we could have. We like to eat well, and prepare mostly fresh foods, and I've never seen the NJB cookbook. Our favorite cookbook is called "Keep it Simple;" it focuses on quick cooking from fresh ingredients; we just stay away from the really expensive recipies that use a lot of shrimp or steak or other not-frugal ingredients.

Sarah

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Avatar for triptakers
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 12:40pm
I hope you dont' mind another reply, even though I don't even know what NJB is.... snacks around here are generally carrots, fruit, leftovers, that sort of thing.

Where I have saved the most money, honestly, is introducing meatless meals - for example the lentil quiche Naomi posted here - even if you cook the lentils in veggie broth & use organic eggs, it's still a lot cheaper than, say Hamburger Helper or something. Not to mention MUCHO healthier! My 3 year old didn't eat it, of course, because it wasn't peanut butter, but my 1 year old LOVED it, and so did we.

Also, making some mexican - we eat black bean burritos nearly every week- cheap, quick, and I bet the kids would LOVE to make their own!

About the whole wheat bread & pasta - not sure if you can front the money for this, but a breadmaker would pay for itself within a year - and many of them have a pasta-making setting. Then you can totally control what goes into your bread & pasta...and goodness knows fresh is sooooo yummy! They're cheaper now, and have a setting so they can bake while you're sleeping,or at work, or whatever. And you could make your own whole wheat pizzas - another fun thing!

HTH and good luck!

Avatar for cl_lfbennett
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 12:40pm
I actually responded to this in another post... I'm so confused! LOL. But I'll copy and paste here so you don't have to go lookin' for it.

I don't like to save money by skimping on nutrition either. That said, we do try to drink a lot of water in our house. But I am a "water snob" and buy the reverse osmosis filtered water from the grocery store for 39 cents a gallon. I justify it by noting that if I drank juice or pop it would cost a lot more!

I think there are a lot of ways to save on groceries and also feed your family healthily. One of the best ways is to include less meat in your diet. Also, use fillers such as mushrooms, onions, zuchinni, potatoes, brown rice, beans etc. Where you're decreasing expensive ingredients, but also adding vitamins and minerals and fiber. I like to use oatmeal instead of bread crumbs in my meatloaf and sometimes for burgers on the grill. You can't taste it at all, but it makes the patties hold together better and adds some good stuff to your diet.

We snack on fruit (on good days! LOL), cheese, peanut butter and crackers, popcorn, homeade baked goods (no artificial ingredients, plus you can add healthy additions such as wheat germ), smoothies.

We don't buy canned veggies either, except for corn. I like frozen much better.

One thing you can do to make ground turkey go further is to add beans to it. I like to make sloppy joes using Tawra's recipe, but instead of all beef I add a can of kidney beans. This also works for anything mexican.

Another cheap, healthy meal is stirfry. You can make 1 or 2 chicken breasts feed a whole family in a stirfry.

Leslie

Leslie
cl-lfbennett @ Frugal Living

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 12:56pm
You're my kind of mama! lol. You're family eat's like mine. I think a lot of people just aren't educated on nutrition and don't understand well-balanced meals. So what is your monthly grocery bill, if you don't mind me asking? I forgot...I have bought cereal from Aldi's before too.

Thanks!

Jennifer

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 08-21-2003 - 1:02pm
I'm sorry about that. I didn't mean to put my post in another area. lol. Thank you for your ideas. I'm not a bean person at all but have tried to add them to my diet a little. I just don't like the texture of beans. I know that legumes really have great benefits when it comes to fiber and protein. I really like a lot of your ideas, thank you!

Jennifer

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