Dysgraphia?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-21-2008
Dysgraphia?
2
Fri, 04-24-2009 - 6:20pm
I've been doing some reading on ADHD recently and one thing I see often in my students who are ADHD and even with my fiance's oldest who has it is handwriting which is almost impossible to read. I know dysgraphia can often be co-morbid with ADHD but I'm curious if anyone else here has a child with ADHD and dysgraphia and how you work with it?


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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
In reply to: ms_m762
Sat, 04-25-2009 - 9:47am
Yup, I do. He has severe combo adhd and dysgraphia and we are finishing up 3rd grade with all A's. Now 4th grade is where the actual mental process of writing starts and that is going to be really hard but we will jump that when we get to it! We go to OT for the physical process and have several pencil grips and have found the ds was pressing to hard on the paper so we started to use a mechinal pencil cause the lead breaks a lot easier with to much pressure. We also taught him cursive. For some reason they found that cursive is just easier for the dysgraphic most of the times. We are also teaching him the keyboard so he can start using it for most work. We are on the Handwriting without tears program and he is done with the 4th grade cursive book but only on the 1st sometimes 2 nd grade print book. Ld online has some good accomdations listed. We also do a sound therapy (listing to music designed for him) and it has helped loads, Gregorian chants for writing and Beach Boys for typing helps to get both sides of his brain talking to each other.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-10-2003
In reply to: ms_m762
Sat, 04-25-2009 - 7:40pm
My son has ADHD, dysgraphia/disorder of written expression. Many kids find cursive easier, but because my son has motor planning problems, cursive is actually harder. So, I would reccomend going with whatever is easier for them. Our Neuropsych has recommended to go to typing for longer assignments. He also only writes on only lined paper or uses a ruler to make lines if they are not provided. There are some special types of paper with heavy lines to help kids keep letters on the line. Pencil grips can correct an incorrect grip but are also useful for kids who have pain when they write due to an overly tight pencil grip. Graph paper with large boxes can be helpful for math to keep numbers aligned. My son is also not required to copy things from the board.