Natural Alt? Op on them..

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-04-2010
Natural Alt? Op on them..
13
Tue, 05-04-2010 - 10:54am

Hello Everyone!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2007
Tue, 05-04-2010 - 12:20pm

HI, and welcome


I use alternatives, as do many people. Kids are all different though, so what works for one may not work for another.

A child may HAVE ADHD, but it is not what they ARE. Never tell a child they ARE ADHD.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Wed, 05-05-2010 - 12:57am

Hi! The book "Healing ADHD" by Daniel Amen has lots of information of supplements that work with the 6 types (as he defines it) ADD. Our library had it, and I recommend that you read it to see where a good place to start is.

My son, almost 8, was diagnosed a couple of months ago. We started vision therapy about the same time he did his testing. The vision therapy was supposed to be for his reading - he skips words and has dyslexic symptoms. He also has fine motor issues with speech and writing, so this made sense to me that his eyes might not be working together properly. Since starting therapy, everyone has noticed how he has calmed down. He no longer HAS to touch EVERYTHING or run wild around a new place. He is able to concentrate more and even his writing has improved. We are half way through treatment and seeing results that I had not expected. In reading more about vision issues, I believe that he was seeing double (he said words moved on the page) and that movement helped things stay focused. The exercises that they have him doing have shown me that he certainly does NOT see things the same way that I do, but is capable of learning. Because he his vision is normal to him, he was never able to tell me that what he saw was outside the norm.

All that said, he is still impulsive, and still prone to running around in the store or speaking more than he should in his couple of classes that he takes. (We homeschool, because I new that he would never be able to get along in a regular classroom.) For the naysayers on this board, I will say that this is not for everyone (I do firmly believe that) but, on the other hand, if you have seen some signs of learning disability as many ADD/ADHD kids have, it might be worth checking out.

If and when the time comes that we do medication, I am interested in a method proposed in a book that I read that basically was associating the effects of the medication with a placebo taste. Basically the child is given the medication with a strong tasting something else - drink, food that they are unfamiliar with - for a few weeks, then given the placebo in place of the medication. While anecdotal, I personally do not see the harm in trying as some other mental health issues (depression) are the result of imbalances of chemicals in the brain, yet not everyone needs to be on antidepressants their whole life. If this doesn't work, and my son really thinks he needs meds we will try them in the more traditional manner. As you have already started medications, this may not work for you. (It also assumes that the child is given the right medication on the first try - from reading here I am not so sure how often that happens!)

We also have changed diet some - protein, eggs or sausage for breakfast, limited processed flour, little to no food coloring (you have to look for this, it is even in cheap chocolate) and going with whole grains and brown rice as much as possible. We have changed milk to grass fed cattle, minimally pasteurized. The milk is mostly because it tastes better and is more like what I got from the farmer up the road when I was a kid, but who knows, it may also be helping. My son likes the protein breakfasts, maybe because he has learned how to scramble an egg, or partially because he feels better than when he eats rice crispies or corn flakes (all minus the sugar, but still highly processed.) We do protein lunches as well - beans and cheese, meat, or sandwiches with whole wheat bread and lunch meat. Dinner always has meat as my husband is a "meat and potatoes, forget the potatoes, meat only" type of guy. I haven't really noticed that my son reacts to sugar or processed foods much, like with birthday cupcakes and such, (we have friends that food coloring or sugar certainly do effect in highly visible ways!) but I figure a good diet can only help with everything.

Good luck with your summer - let us know what ends up working for you.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-04-2010
Wed, 05-05-2010 - 8:26am

Wish I had some of that magic dust! LOL No it is the Pediatrician that thinks he SHOULD have weekend and holiday breaks.

Avatar for cathy_adrian_julian
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-17-2003
Wed, 05-05-2010 - 10:44am

Jumping in this thread to ask for advice this.


What type of magnesium do you suggest? At the moment we have been doing the Fish oil and a multivitamins. I was trying to find a multivitamin that had magnesium in it but it seems hard to find.


I don't know IF is me as a parent being HOPEFUL LOL but after over a month of use, almost 2 months I "think" is working for my 6 yr old. At least taking the edge off. But I wouldn't say he is completely where I would like for him to be.


However for my older son (8yrs old) who is not diagnosed with anything but whom I suspect has ADD inatentive. I don't think this is working at all. After talking to his teacher and seen his work in class something is not right. He is not hyper or anything he seems to daydream a LOT. Even in the middle of him doing his homework. Either way his case is different and I will be addressing him soon with his ped so that we can go see the neuro for him.


So back to my concerns. I am not sure I have the right combination or the right dose or maybe I am missing something??? Any recommendations you might have are welcomed.


In addition to this I have implemented a higher protein brakfast. I TRY my best to do this daily but I will confess to giving Cherrios for brakfast from time to time LOL Lazy me. I tell myself it should be better than fuit loops LOL


Here are the ingredients of the fish oil we are using. Nordic naturals. I guess it doesnt have the amount recommended of DHA, This is the highest DHA of their children products. I might have to switch to their adult products which has like 625 mg. I'm just afraid of the taste. Mind you my kids don't like the children starwberry flavor either. They just don't like the oily texture at all. I have to put it in their juice or their yogurt which they are ok with. A chewable would be better but I wnat to make sure they get the correct amount so we can continue to do the oil and I will find ingenius way to give it to them LOL


Ingredients: purified arctic cod liver oil, d-alpha tocopherol, strawberry flavor, rosemary extract

One-Half Teaspoon Contains:
Total Omega-3s: 631 mg
EPA: 205 mg
DHA: 313 mg
Other Omega-3s: 113 mg
Vitamin A: 325–750 IU
Vitamin D: 0–10 IU
Vitamin E: 15 IU


For multivitamins they are taking Animal parade chewables.


Supplement Facts

Serving Size: 2 Chewable Animal-Shaped Tablets

Servings per Container: 90







Amount Per Serving
% Daily Value





Calories
10






Total Carbohydrate
2 g
<1%





Sugars
2 g
*





Vitamin A (as palmitate)
5000 IU
100%





Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid)
60 mg
100%





Vitamin D (Ergocalciferol)
400 IU
100%





Vitamin E (as d-alpha tocopheryl acetate)
30 IU
100%





Thiamin (vitamin B-1)(as thiamine HCl)
1.5 mg
100%





Riboflavin (Vitamin B-2)
1.7 mg
100%





Niacin (as niacinamide)
20 mg
100%





Vitamin B6 (as pyridoxine HCl)
2 mg
100%





Folate (as Folic Acid)
10 mcg
3%





Vitamin B12 (as Cyanocobalamin)
6 mcg
100%





Biotin
50 mcg
17%





Pantothenic Acid (as Calcium Pantothenate)
10 mg
100%





Calcium (as aminoate complex)
20 mg
2%





Iron (as aminoate complex)
5 mg
28%





Iodine (from Kelp)
100 mcg
67%





Magnesium (as aminoate complex)
10 mg
3%





Zinc (as aminoate complex)
3 mg
20%





Copper (as aminoate complex)
0.05 mg
3%





Manganese (as aminoate complex)
0.05 mg
3%





Potassium (as aminoate complex)
1 mg
<1%





Pineapple Fruit
50 mg
*





Apple Fruit
50 mg
*





Sunflower Oil
20 mg
*





Lemon Bioflavonoid Complex (from Citrus Lemon fruit)
20 mg
*





PABA (para-Aminobenzoic Acid)
400 mcg
*





Choline (as bitartrate)
10 mcg
*





Inositol
10 mcg
*



Disney Family Vacation May 2009

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2007
Wed, 05-05-2010 - 11:40am

Hi, and welcome


The Dose of EPA and DHA is not high enough, you may see better results with a Higher therapeutic dose. They would actually need to take

A child may HAVE ADHD, but it is not what they ARE. Never tell a child they ARE ADHD.

Avatar for cathy_adrian_julian
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-17-2003
Wed, 05-05-2010 - 2:56pm

Thank you.


Yes, I can tell with my oldest none of this work. It wasn't until my youngest got diagnosed with ADHD combined that we started reading and realizing that perhaps something is going on with him. His teacher says he is looking at her while she is talkingbut when she calls on him to see if he understood he has no idea what she just said. He is passing second grade right now but I think is because she is a good teacher and does things to keep him in check like tapping on his desk to bring him back to the world LOL and using a timer because otherwise he gets sidetracked and time is up. Plus at home when becomes to school I am always on top of him and doing extra things with him.


Other than that she says he is awesome and very respectful but she is worried that by third grade things get worse.


At home he is good. He does what needs to get done and anything I ask him to do he does without protesting. Where I see the problem at home is mainly on academic things. For example addition and substraction with regrouping. He KNOWS the rules, He knows how to solve the problem. Even word problem he know how to solve it. Yet when is time to execute it he mixes things.


Let's say is 72

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Wed, 05-05-2010 - 11:05pm

Check out the "Healing ADHD" book for magnesium supplements amounts. Also, he recommends certain things for hyperactive and different things for inattentive, which may help you get better results.

It sounds like there is something else going on with your son with the math and all. Has he had any testing done for learning disabilities? Auditory processing and vision processing/tracking issues come to mind. From teachers I have spoken to, comprehension goes back to not having all the basics. If he seems to know all his phonics and rules, is he skipping over words or something that is causing him to understand incorrectly? If that is the case, a vision check up, which checking of tracking (moving together across the page) and convergence (focusing eyes on a close spot together) may help determine if that is or is not an issue. You can check this some by seeing if he can look at your finger tip as you move it slowly close to his nose. See if both eyes move in the same amount. If not, see if you can get diagnosed as lazy eye so insurance will pay for vision therapy.

My son skips words or does the last word first because he couldn't get his eyes to focus together. He has to concentrate so hard on focusing that he has a really hard time remembering what it is he is supposed to do. I hate to think how hard it would be for him to try to sit still and read stuff on the board while a teacher was talking. (We homeschool so it isn't too much of an issue.) I initially (when he was 3-4) thought he had auditory processing issues because it took so many repetitions to get him to "hear" me. After doing the vision therapy I am thinking that he was so hyper concentrating on seeing stuff clearly that he had no attention left to give me. Now that he doesn't work so hard to see clearly, his response time has improved greatly (unless the TV is on, LOL!)

Good luck on this - and no matter what some doctor says, trust your mom instinct. I think that is the only thing that has gotten us results - me being bullheaded and insisting that things were not as I was being told by the "experts" until I got something that has fit what I see in my son. I had to do it with the schools to get speech and OT and with the doctors to get the help we needed.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 05-06-2010 - 9:54am

ADHD-inattentive isn't *that* hard to diagnose, you just have to make sure it's not any of the other potential causes of inattentiveness ;}. OK, seriously, my kid is ADHD-inattentive (primarily, at least!). What you are saying sounds a bunch like it to me (and I am NOT an expert!). For MY kid, it was writing we could see it in easiest. Post 1st grade, you'd ask him to write a sentence. Generally, he could think up what he wanted to write fairly easily. But writing it, oh, wow. I'd have to refocus him every word some days, the most he could do was about half a sentence. Once he started meds? Just not an issue. Oh, sure writing was still hard afterwards (nothing took away the fine-motor OT component), but at least he could succeed!

One of the things we did along with the ADHD workup was an academic workup so we could be sure that the issues we saw weren't "just" a LD. Though do be aware that ADHD kids can certainly also have LDs!

Oh, and I agree with the Cl--nothing's worked for my kid other than the traditional meds. Omegas do things for moods some, with him (sort of the fragility thing), but nothing truly helps. Even with meds, he needed help for years keeping on track, more than his peers did, at least (for writing!).

Megan
Megan
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2010
Sun, 05-09-2010 - 1:32am

Do you guys ever feel like the people diagnosing todays children "jump the gun" a little bit when it comes to diagnosing children w/ADHD?


I feel like there is nothing wrong with a kid who loses focus and cant sit still.. I was like that as a kid and I just feel like more and more, people are turning to drugs (natural or not) to calm their kids down a little bit, just because they cant deal with the NATURAL behavior of a healthy child... Just my 2 cents


iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2007
Sun, 05-09-2010 - 1:01pm
NO, I do not. There are kids with real problems, and ADHD is a REAL problem. Not everyone chooses to use meds, but this is not a debate board.

A child may HAVE ADHD, but it is not what they ARE. Never tell a child they ARE ADHD.

A child may HAVE ADHD, but it is not what they ARE. Never tell a child they ARE ADHD.

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