New here - question re: Inattentive type

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2004
New here - question re: Inattentive type
7
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 12:23pm

Hi,


I am very new to the realm of ADHD.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2007
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 9:45pm

I totally understand, I fought for 3 years in court with our Sd to get DD a 504 plan, then an IEP. They read her questions to her because they are forced too, and she is in 7th grade. I would try to find an advocate in your area, many are free and take some of the load from you. It made it alot easier for me to confront the school

A child may HAVE ADHD, but it is not what they ARE. Never tell a child they ARE ADHD.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2004
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 9:03pm

Hi,


Thank you for all of that great information.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 8:35pm

Your child does not need to be ADD in order to get help. A diagnosis of auditory processing disorder is ENOUGH.

They are entitled to help under a number of laws, including IDEA 2004, Section 504 of the ADA, and No Child Left Behind, among OTHERS.

In order for children with disabilities to receive services, they must by identified and then determined to be eligible for these services. Under IDEA guidelines, school districts are required to identify and evaluate ALL CHILDREN suspected of having a disability whose families reside within the district. Section 504 does not have this requirement.

IDEA
* Covers all school-aged children who fall within one or more specific categories of qualifying conditions (i.e., autism, specific learning disabilities, speech or language impairments, emotional disturbance, traumatic brain injury, visual impairment, hearing impairment, and other health impairments).
* Requires that a child's disability adversely affects her educational performance.
HOWEVER, In 2006, another change was made... For years, schools were required to wait until a child fell considerably behind grade level before being eligible for special education services. Today, with the release of the final regulations of IDEA 2004, school districts are no longer required to follow this 'discrepancy model,' but are allowed to find other ways to determine when a child needs extra help. This is being implemented throughout the country through a process called Response to Intervention.

Section 504
* Covers individuals who meet the definition of qualified "handicapped" person -- for example, a child who has or has had a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity or is regarded as handicapped by others. (Major life activities include: walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, working, caring for oneself, and performing manual tasks.)
* Does not require that a child need special education to qualify. Note: Students who are ineligible for services or are no longer entitled to services under IDEA (e.g., kids with LD who no longer meet IDEA eligibility criteria) may be entitled to accommodations under Section 504.
Section 504
* Does not require an IEP, but does require a plan.
* "Appropriate" means an education comparable to the education provided to those students who are not disabled.
* Placement is usually in a general education classroom. Children receive specialized instruction, related services, or accommodations within the general education classroom.
* Provides related services, if needed.

Due Process Procedures
Sometimes parents and school districts disagree about how a child with disabilities should be educated. When this happens, there are procedures in place to handle these disagreements.

IDEA
* Must provide impartial hearings for parents who disagree with the identification, evaluation, or placement of the student.
* Requires written consent.
* Describes specific procedures.
* An impartial appointee selects a hearing officer.
* Provides "stay-put" provision (the student's current IEP and placement continues to be implemented) until all proceedings are resolved.
* Parents must receive ten days' notice prior to any change in placement.
* Enforced by U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education.

Section 504
* Must provide impartial hearings for parents who disagree with the identification, evaluation, or placement of the student.
* Does not require parental consent.
* Requires that parents have an opportunity to participate and be represented by legal counsel -- other details are left to the discretion of the school.
* A hearing officer is usually appointed by the school.
* No "stay-put" provisions.
* Does not require that parents are notified prior to the student's change of placement, but they still must be notified.
* Enforced by U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2007
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 4:10pm
YOur ped will probably be able to refer you to someone who can do an evaluation. She could also refer you to a Psychiatrist for meds, but should not be diagnosing, or prescribing meds for ADHD

A child may HAVE ADHD, but it is not what they ARE. Never tell a child they ARE ADHD.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2004
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 2:47pm

Thanks for your quick replies.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 2:18pm

All over the map testing-wise is what my kid was/is like too--very clearly he uses his skills to help in the weak spots, but there's a limit to how well that works!

Honestly, yes, that sounds a lot like ADHD-inattentive. Naturally enough, it could be other things too. Of course, one of my theories of the world is something like "if the ADHD meds help your child, does it really matter why?" ;}.

Though I'm kinda surprised she had THAT many testers see the distracts & noone thought ADHD-inattentive. It *ought* to be a standard thought! Though...with my kid, it did vary quite alot per tester, even after the ADHD diagnosis. Those one-on-one tests are pretty good areas for ADHDers--no outside distractions & an adult around to refocus you as needed, always "in your face" as it were. So they might not've seen it & your teachers might not be experienced enough.

IMHO, an eval never hurts.

I should probably note that the ADHD meds aren't a magic wand--to use your example, what it gives my kid is more of those days where he just learns. Everyone has bad days, of course, but he has many more times where he isn't spending all his energy on trying to focus, with the meds. If that makes sense!

Megan
Megan
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2007
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 2:06pm

Hi, and welcome


Yes it sounds familiar. My 12 yo DD has ADHD/innattentive. I would comntact a Neuropsychologist for an evaluation, since ADHD/in is the hardest type to diagnose, and it will likely take many visits and alot of testing.


it is also possible it's only an Auditory processing disorder, they can both have the same symptoms.


The school is not

A child may HAVE ADHD, but it is not what they ARE. Never tell a child they ARE ADHD.