Pre-study on ADHD and Home Schooling

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Registered: 05-02-2004
Pre-study on ADHD and Home Schooling
7
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 12:51am

Experiences of ADHD-Labeled Kids Who Switch
from Conventional Schooling to Homeschooling or Unschooling

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A few months ago Peter Gray, Ph.D., a research professor of psychology at Boston College and a writer for Psychology Today, put out a call for stories about children who have been diagnosed with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and have been homeschooled and/or unschooled. He received 28 accounts of experiences from different families -- and then set out to analyze the data.

What he found from these personal stories suggests that (1) most ADHD-diagnosed kids do fine without drugs if they are not in a conventional school; (2) the ADHD characteristics don't vanish when the kids leave conventional school, but the characteristics are no longer as big a problem as they were before; and (3) ADHD-diagnosed kids seem to do especially well when they are allowed to take charge of their own education.

Mr. Gray's article includes excerpts from these families' stories.

Here is a link to the full article:

www.psychologytoday.com/blog/freedom-learn/201009/experiences-adhd-labeled-kids-who- switch-conventional-schooling-homeschool

(Copied from the Homeschooling Notebook because it was such an excellent summary.)

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Registered: 04-08-2008
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 10:22am

I think he hits the nail right on the head, though.

Avatar for Cmmelissa
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Registered: 11-13-2008
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 12:55pm
I wish they would have given information on whether any of the kids where ADHD inattentive. My son (8th grade) is taking one of his classes through the high school's virtual academy. In the last month, I've been thinking about switching him over to it next year since he's struggling so hard on keeping up with assignments and staying organized. I think if he was home, I'd be able to keep him on task better, and up to date on his assignments. He would still be on meds though in order to keep up with the classes, that wouldn't change for him so it goes against what they found in the article. My biggest concern is that he would suffer socially being at home all the time, but at least the option is there if we need it in the future.

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Registered: 05-02-2004
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 9:31pm
You are right, there are fewer jobs, and schools tend to steer kids away from doing the VoTech that was the norm when I was a kid.
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Registered: 05-02-2004
Tue, 03-20-2012 - 9:34pm
Melissa, see what he thinks before you make the change. There will be more effort if he is excited about what he is doing. The above article though...would not be for a virtual school at home, it is more self led learning that (from the sounds of it) that is what keeps the kids learning. If the child is not interested in the material, the material is not relevant to the child, I think that there will be more inattentive stuff going on. So, see if he is interested, and want to make it work, and be sure the program is flexible enough in ways that he needs.
Avatar for Cmmelissa
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Registered: 11-13-2008
Thu, 03-22-2012 - 4:39pm
I see what your saying. My problem is that he's entering into high school, so there are subjects he'll have to take that he might not find as interesting. I was excited to learn that they might be offering more core classes in the high school in the upcoming years for kids that learn better with a virtual course. The administrator of the program was saying that the schools need to adapt to how some students learn differently, not all methods work the same.

I'm hoping that next year will be better in the respect that he'll have more options on the classes he can take. He's very excited about getting the chance to take CAD drawing, it's a subject I think he can really get into.

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Registered: 03-26-2012
Tue, 03-27-2012 - 12:06am

We've been doing a virtual homeschool this year with our 11 yo. dd and 9 yo. dd, both of whom have ADHD. I know it's not the same as self-led homeschool, but I definitely see a difference in how much they're learning. My oldest still has a hard time focusing, but we're better able to go over topics again, or approach them from different angles, than if she was at school and I didn't know what needed more work until it's essentially too late.

Caroline

I'm a Type A mom, and my husband and two precious girls have ADHD. My youngest also struggles with PDD-NOS and Sensory Processing Disorder. Visit the chaos at our house at
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Registered: 05-02-2004
Wed, 03-28-2012 - 9:26pm
It is nice that your school is open to the idea that kids learn differently! And have some good courses!