Transition from an IEP to a 504?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-21-2008
Transition from an IEP to a 504?
5
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 7:02pm

My oldest step-daughter has ADHD. She had an IEP at her old school but after transferring it up here, the SPED teacher and the school psychologist are wondering if she needs one. Her handwriting is very difficult to read (I often wonder if she has dysgraphia) and her IEP says she has accommodations on state assessments. I'm wondering if we should pursue a 504 plan if they decide she doesn't need the IEP anymore. We're fully aware of the benefits and drawbacks to both because I work in public education as a general classroom teacher. I'm curious if anyone else has made the transition for their children.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2006
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 8:01pm

I have alot of concern when a school wants to drop an IEP without formal testing.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-21-2008
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 9:08pm
I am well aware that they have to do formal testing. Our school psychologist is one of the best with whom I've worked and I know the SPED teachers at my step-daughters' school well. I'm merely looking at the range of possibilities. To be perfectly honest, I question many of the things the school psychologist placed on file with both my step-daughters; he went as far as to label both girls with diagnoses that I find questionable at best. Our goal is to make sure she's getting the services she needs.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-10-2003
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 10:57pm

I would definitely pursue a 504 if your step-daughter no longer qualifies for an IEP if she still needs use accommodations in the general classroom. As far as accommodations for state testing, it is best to have that in writing because when it comes time for college entrance testing, ACT or SAT, the test agency will need this documentation.

My son has dysgraphia and from my experience and my extensive research, it is not well-understood in the U.S. public schools. If you think that she needs dysgraphia related interventions I would highly recommend getting an outside Neuropsych evaluation. They simply have more knowledge of the condition and have the time to do more in-depth testing.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 10:23am

My ADHD kid pretty automatically dropped from an IEP to a 504 when he no longer needed pull-out services. Though now he gets speech pragmatics on a 504 in middle school. Not sure what you want to know, or how old your kid is--I wouldn't give up the testing accomodations--being able to TYPE answers is huge for my kid, and I don't think he'd've passed the 4th grade long essay (hours of writing) if he hadn't had the accomodation that let the teacher clarify the question to him. WHY they feel the need to ask kids to do things like "Tell about your best day" when they simply mean "Tell about a good day", I do not know. I don't have the only kid who takes words like "best" literally & must then consider which day was truly the best as opposed to figuring out what he could write about best, like all the other kids do.

Anyhow, yes, the 504 worked for us. So far!

Megan
Megan
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-21-2008
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 7:08pm

That's good to know. She's in 6th grade and I think the transition to a new school has been good for her, with the exception of a few hiccups. I'm not sure what sort of accommodations they provided on her state assessments at her old school because they lived in a different state. From what I've read and seen, they test the same information students in my state are tested on but the format might have been different. All our state assessments with the exception of writing (which, thankfully, is only tested every other year) are computer-based. It's great for students who need those accommodations but it's a pain when technology doesn't cooperate, at least from the teacher perspective. Some of the choices they make on what to put on these assessments really baffles me, especially when it's real classroom teachers making those recommendations. A few years ago, our assessment material asked students to read two articles with differing opinions on divorce and answer questions about them objectively. Yeah, right! But, I digress.

After talking with my husband after the initial review meeting of her IEP, I don't feel quite as bad about her handwriting as I did before. One of her teachers pointed out that it wasn't the worst she's seen and when I thought about it, this teacher would know on many levels as she's experienced the struggle of handwriting with her own children. We're still early in the review process so I guess we'll see what the school psych and her SPED teacher come up with at the next meeting next week.


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