Your ADD/ADHD child at 2 1/2?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2010
Your ADD/ADHD child at 2 1/2?
4
Fri, 12-31-2010 - 8:42pm

Hello-

I'm just wondering what your ADD/ADHD child was like at 2 1/2?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2008
Tue, 01-04-2011 - 1:53pm

At two and a half, our son was bouncing off the walls. We even bought an inflatible bounce house and put it in our living room trying to give him an outlet for his energy (he had so much energy, he broke it). He jumped off the stairs, ran across furniture, climbed the kitchen counter tops and table tops. In gym class, the other moms would sit with their kids in a circle to warm up. I chased our son around the entire gym. Extremely defiant and didn't respond to any parenting or discipline strategies. Extremely smart, too. You couldn't outwit him, even at two, and we considered ourselves pretty bright people.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-19-2008
Sun, 01-02-2011 - 10:17pm
MIne didn't develop ADHD symptoms until about 5 1/2, so I don't really know about younger kids. I would wait until 5-6 or so, and if the behaviors are still there have him evaluated. He sounds ALOT like 2.5 yo grandson who is typical.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Sun, 01-02-2011 - 6:20pm

When my son was 2

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 01-01-2011 - 11:16am
Totally honest? At 2 1/2 my son was not like other kids. I knew that far back that there was something different about him, but I didn't know what. For the record, he's diagnosed with ADHD and ODD, and we still strongly suspect Aspergers.

At 2 1/2, he was incredibly smart, talked really early (and was often confused for a 4 year old), bounced off the walls, didn't sleep, and had no clue how to interact with other kids. Discipline (from the age of 2) has been so difficult with him. Time outs didn't work, sticker charts, marble jars, most anything really didn't work for longer than a day.

For the record, large family gatherings are really hard for my son, even at 9. He's meeting people he doesn't really know, who expect him to know who they are, and act appropriately. People who expect hugs, him to look them in the eye, not bounce off the walls, and things like that. Add to it, it is always crowded, loud, and a sensory nightmare for him. These days, anytime we go somewhere like that, I make sure he has a quiet, separate sort of "safe" place he can go that he can take a book, or video game. It helps him, knowing what and where to go if everything else gets to be too much.
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