Anyone had any skin prick test done?..m

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-17-2003
Anyone had any skin prick test done?..m
6
Thu, 08-07-2003 - 11:47am
The allergy doctor that we're seeing ,(the phd's recommendation)had some bloodwork and stool testing done, and he's also recommending that we get a skin prick done, isn't that for environmental allergy?, my ds is not really affected by that kind of allergy, just wondering if that is related in the treatment of autism, I haven't read about that one.The testing would last for 1-3 hours, and then there will be a follow-up to discuss what the results of all the test. anyone done this before??

TIA,

C.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-06-2003
Thu, 08-07-2003 - 1:25pm
Skin Pricks are used to test weather or not there has been exposure to something. If the test is positive (there is a reaction) Then futher stuff is done depending on what TYPE of skin prick was done in the first place. These pricks can be used from any thing like an allergy to tuberculosis so the types of things that can be tested for are numorous. Just make sure there are only 1 or 2 pricks done & not a panel. Those are painful for adults & I don't want to imagine the effect on an autistic spectrum child. (shudder) But a single pick is a LOT easier to do IMHO then trying to draw blood.

Hopw this helps

stacey

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2003
Thu, 08-07-2003 - 4:53pm
Skin pricks can be used for testing for just about anything. When I was a kid (um, that was a while ago, lol) they were used to test for allergies, but that is no longer a common practice. As Stacey said, they are now used primarily for testing for exposure to certain things. I wish Marry Anne (maresgood) was here (she's on vaccation right now) she's really good at explaining these things. I believe they stopped using skin pricks to test for allergies b/c that involved exposing the person to the suspected allergine, which is risky. I know that latey a few people in my family have been tested for enviromental allergies and that was all done with blood sampling and suspect abtinance (the cat had to go stay at a friends for a few weeks). It's safer to introoduce a suspect allergine to a sequestered blood sample than it is to introduce it directly into the person.

I had a few skin pricks when I was a kid, and Ayla had one a few years ago after she had unkowingly played with a kid who's father had TB. It's been my expirence that they usually only do a follow-up if the prick starts to inflame (shows possitive).

LOL, I don't know if I've been helpful at all. This is one of those times I wish I had beome a MD instead of a pshyc researcher. But, then again, I don't think I could handle inflicting pain on people. So, I'll just have to settle for giving my personal experiences.

I think we have a few more nurses on the board (txlynn...nudge nudge). Maybe one of them can explain it better? :)

Peace,

Candes

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2003
Thu, 08-07-2003 - 4:57pm
A panel? (ditto the shudder). The dr who does that must be a sadist. One prick is bad enough. (shuddering again).

Candes

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-17-2003
Thu, 08-07-2003 - 6:03pm
Thank you for the replies,Me and Dh we're in doubt as to the necessity of the test, he told me that he'll call them tomorrow, and ask what the purpose of the test is. He was the one who took ds to the allergy Doc., if I we're with them I would have question everything. They've already done a bloodwork, and stool testing(still waiting for the results), why do more skin prick? My ds has a mild eczema, and probably some allergy symptom from the molds but , does that warrant a skin prick test? I did a yahoo search and find more info. about the test, it's more for Tuberculosis, and asthma, and it also said it's easier and inexpensive to do than bloodwork, well, bloodwork was done wouldn't that be enough? yes, I agree that it can also be used in determining a lot of allergies.I just don't want to expose my ds for more allergy,'cause it says on the pamphlet they gave us for preparation, that if severe sneezing, or asthma occurs call them asap, Ds doesn't have asthma,'don't want him to get one if ever we do the skin prick.and I have no idea how many they're going to do, bloodwork was already hard to do, dh had to pin-him down on the exam table to get it done.I just hope that this is just not another ploy to get more money from us.:( feel sorry for my ds.

Thanks again,

C.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2003
Thu, 08-07-2003 - 11:59pm


Skin pricks are no big deal. They are common practice for allergy testing. If your child has eczema and seems to react to mold, chances are he's got an allergy or two. Allergy can affect behavior as well and I've heard of kids who've been dx'd with autism (or other things) only to find out that most of the their problems stem from an allergy to a food or something in their environment (not to imply that is the case here).

What's involved? They have a little brush like thing with up to 8 points on it. They will lightly prick the skin with serum from various allergens (ranging from foods to molds to dust to grasses etc.) The prick will just scratch the skin and they will watch the skin for reaction (swelling/hive) and take it from there. They don't hurt, it's just a little prick, MUCH MUCH less than a shot. Doing the eight at a time is LESS discomfort than doing them one at a time.

Monika

Cost of a booster seat ... as little as $15
Time it takes to buckle him up ... 15 seconds
Maki

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-17-2003
Fri, 08-08-2003 - 2:36am
Thank you for your input,that is very reassuring,and probably would help us decide whether to do it or not.The alergy Doc. gave us a prescription for a cream that we have to apply 30 mins. f=before the testing to help numb the part that they'll do the testing.They saw his reaction to the bloodwork last time, so they want to make sure he don't get scare too much this time.I just want to make sure that it has something to do in finding out about food allergies which triggers autistic behaviors-which my ds don't have, except for echolalic speech when he's tired and hungry.

Thanks again,

C.