Cats in a sack comment

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2008
Cats in a sack comment
8
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 7:22am

Euan and I went to a private screening of a film made by a local initiative that supports teenagers with Aspergers: it was really good, the kids had interviewed several of themselves and their parents about what it was like living with Asperger's, and it was very moving. (will try and get it uploaded to you tube or something if I can). there was one question (I think prompted by the professionals!) about whether kids with Asperger's should be in their own class or in a mainstream classroom with an aide (Euan had an initial rant about this "these are not the only options! everyone with Asperger's is different! not everyone needs an aide OR a different class, it depends what you need help with! that's such a stupid limited question!" - god, that was embarrasing, even if he was actually right, I think LOL) he decided to tell the filmakers why he thought the separate class idea was a bad one. (you have to imagine this, a very serious 11 year old doing is best not to 'patronise' a very experienced therapist LOL)


" You see, you can't have a class full of people with Asperger's Syndrome, this would be like having a sack full of cats. Aspies are very like cats, they like to be alone, they don't have very good social skills. You can't put a bunch of people who don't like socialising together in a class, they will just drive each other mad: it would be like putting a bunch of cats in a sack. People will get HURT and I don't just mean that metaphorically. I can only survive in a proper classroom because I have people around me who understand this wierd NT world you guys all live in: who is going to translate the world if EVERYONE has Asperger's??!"


I have to say, that was an EXTREMELY proud mummy moment for me!


He also decided to take it upon himself to tell the filmakers that they were too negative and there were lots of positive things about Asperger's that they didn't even ask about, and to tell them that one of their questions was silly "How would your life be different if you didn't have Asperger's?" "I mean, how are you supposed to KNOW? I've had Asperger's Syndrome all my life, how on earth do I know what it is like to live without it? You might as well ask the sky what it is like to be snow....!"


Kirsty, proud mum to Euan (11, Asperger's) Rohan (7, NT) and Maeve (4, NT)

, mu

"My definition of housework is to sweep the room with a glance"


Follow my blog on http://mumsnet.com/blogs/kirsteinr/


 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 7:48am

Wow,

                                

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2009
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 1:22pm
You have a brilliant son. Reminds me of the little boy from the show "Parenthood". Have you seen it?
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2003
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 3:57pm

that's Brilliant!

Go Euan for being smart, insightful and an advocate. You are right to be proud

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-18-2008
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 4:16pm

That is an awesome analogy!!! Go Euan!! Good for him for speaking his voice!!!

Nikole

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 4:36pm
I am just floored by his analogy, he is very brilliant!

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2008
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 4:47pm

Too funny - and very apt and insightful. He's really come along, hasn't he?

Andrea, mom to

Graham
Miles
Anson

Andrea, mom to

Graham
Miles
Anson
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-08-2009
Tue, 05-18-2010 - 5:53pm
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2004
Thu, 05-20-2010 - 12:51pm

It sounds like Euan is a very self-confident but maybe more importantly, self-aware young man. Kudos to you mom for making sure he understands Asperger's so well.

My son is 14 (PDD-NOS) and is still in denial I think. "I know how to make friends, I don't need social skills classes." He even tells the docs he has friends but in reality what he has is classmates and occasional brief interactions with neighbor kids. A lot of it is emotional immaturity -- he calls a first grader his best friend. But it is frustrating because you can't help someone who won't admit they have a problem.

Your son is wise beyond his years. Thanks for sharing!

-Christine