Different grade levels all in one class

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-2008
Different grade levels all in one class
2
Sat, 08-28-2010 - 7:14pm

My son started kindergarten last week at a new school because we had to move. He is in an autism kindergarten, 2nd, and 3rd grade level class. At meet-the-teacher day his teacher told me that the class is basically structured according to educational level of each child rather than grade level. There is one other autism kindergarten through 2nd grade class in his school as well.

I'm kind of confused as to how one teacher can teach 3 separate grades at once and wonder if this is a normal class model for the autism classes. Have your kids been in a class that housed more than one grade? How does it work? Do you find your child's educational needs were met?

I think it is kind of odd for my kindergartner to be in a class with 2nd and 3rd graders. He is so tiny compared to the rest of the class. I'm wondering if he is in this class because he is higher functioning than the other kindergarten through 2nd grade class. This first week of school was very hectic for all involved so I have not had a chance to chat with his teacher. He had a bad first week of school due to the new routines, new school, new teachers, etc. Every day dropping him off he had to be carried/drug into class and he cried and tried to run away and refused to eat lunch, cooperate, etc. I hope it gets better. He loved his old school and teachers.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 08-28-2010 - 8:47pm

Our school district has 2 autism classes.

                                

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
Sun, 08-29-2010 - 12:06pm

I'm running off to something else right now, so I have to be brief.

My daughter attends a school that uses a multi-age classroom structure, and I think it works well for her. Our school is not specifically for children with learning challenges, but tends to attract non-typical learners, due in part to a shortened schedule (4 hours, 4 days a week, with parents responsible for 1/2 of the instruction).

Her class is small, and her academics are very individualized. The multiple age levels let her be in different groups for different subjects (she's much better in reading than math), and she can function more fluidly in a social sense, by interacting with with younger children, as well as seeing proper behavior modeled by older students.

Mary