Does your school provide social skills?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2003
Does your school provide social skills?
7
Sun, 02-14-2010 - 5:16pm

I haven't posted in a long time, but continue to come here to read posts &

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2007
Sun, 02-14-2010 - 5:57pm
My 11 yr old was getting 30 min. a week social skills with a group and 30 minutes individual counseling in elementary school. The group session involved a lot of board games that emphasize winning/losing, taking turns, complimenting each other. The individual sessions focused more on self-awareness and self control. Now that he's in middle school this year, he really isn't getting any of that, but he's more mature now and needs it less, and as a middle schooler he is more self conscious
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 02-15-2010 - 1:39am

In the IEP services are driven by goals which are driven by needs. It is pretty standard for kids with ASDs to have social goals on their IEP.

In order to get compensatory social skills training for him what you need to do is show that the school did not meet his needs (ie he did not make adequate progress in this area) or did not provide services they agreed to. The best way to show they did not meet hsi needs is if he made no gains on his social goals.

Go through his last IEP. Check the social area under his present levels of performance page and check the "area's of need" under his present levels of performance page. Do they mention social needs? Where those addressed? Also read his goals and find all his social goals. Did he make progress on those goals? Check the notes, special factors page and front page to see if they listed what he would be provided as far as social skills training. Did they provide it?

If you cannot show that he didn't make progress or that they didn't provide what was in his IEP it is not a loss. You likely can't get compensatory services, however, you can still call an IEP meeting at anytime and ask that some appropriate social goals be added and make sure they record in the IEP your concerns about his social skills.

If he has some good social goals then they HAVE To find ways to implement them and try to meet the goals. If they don't meet the goals or can't make adequate progress then you can get compensatory services.

Good luck.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 02-16-2010 - 3:12pm

DS has a lunch bunch once every 2 weeks. (10 y/o in 5th grade). Last year he was in an inclusion classroom and had lunch bunch every week plus the class special ed teacher pretty much guided all social interaction. Last year was a relaly great year, and DS even made some friends!


This year, they moved DS into gifted classroom without an aid (and not inclusion). He has ended up the target of bullies and has seriously regressed socially.


DS's IEP has a social skills goal on it, so everyday he is supposed to be seen by the 5ht grade special ed teacher to check on how he feels, how he is doing, etc. That obviously hasn't worked out so well ----


Being in mainstreamed class with an aid or inclusion class ALONG WITH an IEP that states the social goals is needed. The lunch bunch is good, but not enough.


We also use outside therapy and boy scouts to help build social skills. It is very hard!


Jackie

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2003
Tue, 02-16-2010 - 11:08pm

In a word, no. Neither of the schools our spectrum kiddos attend offer social skills therapy. Supposedly, our 9 year old gets it in speech, but I don't buy it. Her issues are all language related, and the other students are true "speech" kids, so she can't communicate, and they just think she's weird. Our son's school was supposed to create a social skills group at the beginning of the year, but that's never happened.

And I have to agree with Jackie...the lunch bunch idea is "good"- but it's really not enough, IMHO.

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Amy

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-13-2006
Thu, 02-18-2010 - 5:12pm

I understand what you're saying, Renee, but the tricky part is proving that there has been progress (or lack of).

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2007
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 7:12am
I think that is the hardest part. Writing effective IEP goals is truly an art form and many of us (myself included) rely on the school to write the goals because we think they are the "professionals" and they aren't any better at it than we are! The time and effort that it requires is a full time job in itself.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 9:27am

ITA! We get these vague reports on goals that say "making adequate progress...." and there is no way to know what that means. We also don't see any changes at all, so I wonder what they thought was "adequate"?


Unfortunately, the social stuff fall slow on the list of all the things we have to work on, and we all get sort of "burned out" working on so much in support of DS, however, when we have ignored the social stuff, it rears its ugly head by all building up to some kind of horrible disaster (latest one was DS getting kicked in the crotch by a bully!) and then everyone drops all the other stuff and focuses on the social things.....it's a terrible cycle and I'm not sure how to break it, but one thing we are about to do (in process of re-writing the IEP), is to insist that we get weekly written detailed reports about what was measured and what the conclusions were. You have to write the "frequency and method" of communication into the IEP anyway, so I'm just going to insist that the communication starts being something we can use. Frankly, I'd rather have fewer goals (keeping social as a high priority) and better communication that the 7-8 goals we have!


Jackie