girls with Asperger's

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-15-2010
girls with Asperger's
5
Sat, 05-15-2010 - 2:03am

After about 6 yrs of trying to find out why my daughter's behaviour is the way it is, I'm confident that she has Asperger's.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-27-2008
Sat, 05-15-2010 - 9:08am
I have a 14 year old dd who was diagnosed when she was 11.
Pick away.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-28-2008
Sat, 05-15-2010 - 9:34am

There's a book out - saw it on Amazon - about girls with Aspergers by Tony Attwood, an Aspergers expert.

http://www.amazon.com/Aspergers-Girls-Tony-Attwood/dp/193256540X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273930187&sr=1-1

There are other books too. Just type Girls with Aspergers into the search box.

I have all boys, so I can't help you with advice, but I can understand how frustrating it is to try to get a dx. Lots of professionals are not in the know. Have you tried your local Children's Hospital? Often they have an Autism team that is really good.

Best of luck in your search for answers.

Andrea, mom to

Graham
Miles
Anson

Andrea, mom to

Graham
Miles
Anson
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2005
Sat, 05-15-2010 - 9:57am

I have a 15yo dd with AS who didn't get a dx until she was 12yo. I also have an 11yo ds with AS (dx at 8yo). My dd symptoms are different than my ds symptoms and, in fact, it was my ds who first prompted me to seek a dx at all.

My kids were evaluated by a team of dr at Children's Hospital's neuropsych team. After each doc conducted their own eval, they met as a team to decide on the diagnosis (dx). There was apparently a fair amount of discussion between the docs over which dx my dd should receive since the docs didn't necessarily see eye-to-eye about dd symptoms. The docs were all in immediate agreement over ds dx, though.

Because girls' symptoms do not always follow the stereotypical pattern of boys' symptoms, it can be harder to dx. Since a lot of diagnosing is done through self-reporting, the more info you can provide the doctors, the better it will be for them to understand the bigger picture.

Write down as many examples as you can of your dd symptoms. That will be useful for helping the docs get a better picture of what's going on with your dd. If you don't have a Children's Hospital near you, you might try getting an eval from a neuropsychologist or a developmental pediatrician.

Good luck!

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2003
Sat, 05-15-2010 - 6:07pm

The only reason my daughter was diagnosed is because her older brother was, and we watched her like a hawk. Her AS is much less pronounced than his -much more subtle. This is partly because he is farther along the Spectrum and I think, partly because of her gender and personality.

However, there are some areas -particularly social areas, where he is better than she is. I think this is because he *knows* he is bad socially and therefore he makes an effort, whereas she ...doesn't.

I think part of the reason that so few girls are diagnosed is because the "one in four" thing becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. One in four doctors will fail to recognize AS in girls ;)

I have not read the Tony Attwood book, but I have heard good things about it. I think if you are going to try and have your daughter formally diagnosed, to try and do it a large center that specializes in Autistic spectrum disorders.

Please feel free to hang with us too; official diagnosis or none. We are happy to answer questions or to listen if you need to vent or cry.

-Paula

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 05-15-2010 - 8:09pm

I have a 16yo dd with AS and a 14yo son with ASD.

My daugther was diagnosed at 4 with PDD-NOS due to her language delay but now as a teen she definitely blends in better than her brother and most of her friends think she is quirky, odd, sometimes a bit rude and clueless but only 1 knows she has AS.

Cait's current symptoms include most on the spectrum but she has enough skills now to fake it, kwim? she does have friends. In fact she has a boy friend and a group of friends she is getting ready to go to the movies with tonight and last night she went to the beach with a different set of friends.

Her grades are aweful. She also has a learning disability and HORRIFIC organizational skills so she has an IEP and is failing 2 core classes this year.

She is the epitome of a flake. she can appear cold and thoughtless because she has no perspective taking skills. For instance, tonight she was going to go out with friends (including mainly a guy) and didn't understand why her new boyfriend might be upset by not being invited. We had to prompt her through inviting him along. (I like this kid. He is nice, smart and safe).

There are really too many things to go into here so what kind of questions do you have?

Renee

At the tree Tunnel

APOV on Autism
Photobucket