homework and academics

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
homework and academics
2
Thu, 04-10-2003 - 8:56am
Question for you guys. My dd is in kindergarten, and doing just fine with phonics, simple sounding out of words, addition, sets, that sort of thing. His Sped teacher feels the kids should get homework to keep routine, reinforce ideas, etc. Tom does just fine with homework -- was up to five worksheets a night, and reading words, etc.

All of a sudden, he's down to two sheets a night, and doing super-simple counting and phonics again. I sent a suggestion to the teacher that he could do more; her response was that she didn't want him to feel negative about schoolwork, and that homework is about reinforcing old ideas: not about pushing toward new academic goals.

Now I certainly don't want to overdo the academics. But if he was doing fine, and I, at least, see no sign that he's feeling academically overwhelmed, why the slowdown? What are your opinions? (I know we can push him a bit at home, and we do -- but I'm curious about the school thing because he'll have the same teacher next year, and I wanna figure this one out!)

Thanks,

Lisa

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 04-11-2003 - 10:32pm
Lisa,

I had the same thing happen with Jade when I enrolled her into a craft class at her OT's request. The teacher was great for the most part. But we did have a problem with getting him to assign the right amount of homework. He was afraid of overloading her with too much but instead she ended up getting bored with the class and wanted to quit. The OT and I convinced him that as her mother I am the one who is in the best possition to tell if she is being overloaded. I promised him I would let him know if I thought that was happening. It never did. She did fine with the class.

Maybe you can make a deal with the teacher to let her know if you think Tom is being given too much? In the mean time, he sould be given as much homework as the other kids in his class. If he already is then maybe you can come up with worksheets or excersises of your own for him to do so he doesn't get bored. As a homeschooler and ES I think that boredom is the biggest culprit of backsliding in education. I see it all the time in the kids I work with and sometimes even in my own. If Tom is capable of doing harder work or more work then have him do it. You know him best and will be able to tell if it is getting to be too much for him.

Just my copper pennies,

Candes

Peace,
Candes  
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 04-12-2003 - 9:59pm
It's hard to zero in on how much each child is doing. It's a small class, but includes a range of sped kids in grades K-2. Some have serious reading problems; others have behavior problems; etc. Tom is on top of the academics, but having significant trouble with behavior/language.

My sense is that he DOES feel pushed, but not in terms of the reading/phonics/adding/etc. stuff. He's being pushed hard to manage routines, transitions, social skills, interactions, language -- and it's hard for him. He's pushing back a bit.

Initially, the teacher said she wanted to push kids hard academically, so that they'd be ahead of the game. For a while, I thought she was. Now, I'm just not so sure. He really seems to ME to have mastered many concepts, but she says that he doesn't demonstrate mastery at school. I'm guessing that's quite true. I'm also guessing that she (the teacher) wants to see him work independently before pushing him on to the next academic level - -but he just zones out, and can't/won't finish even a simple worksheet without one-on-one support. Which he gets... but...

Anyway, I'm planning to chat with her about a couple of things, and this'll be one of them. But it is so hard to know what will really be helpful...

Thanks for the "ear,"

Lisa