Let the Stress Begin!

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-11-2010
Let the Stress Begin!
12
Thu, 08-05-2010 - 5:08pm

Just a little background. My 6 year old dd was diagnosed PDD-NOS a few months ago. We don't have a detailed report yet, but we just finished testing. Her ped psych wanted to wait until she was 6 to do all the testing, she just turned 6 in June.

I can feel the stress starting to build, school starts in 2 weeks. I'm very anxious about how 1st grade will go. It's been so nice all summer not having to worry about how her behavior was at school (social issues). No yellow lights or red lights to discuss. She does not deal well with change so I can only imagine how the school year will begin. I've been being very positive with her and talking about it. She's excited about going, so that's a plus.

I'm not sure if she will have a 504 or an IEP, but she will need some special treatment it seems. That also makes me nervous, the thought of going through the process with a new teacher. I was very fortunate that her kindergarten teacher was someone I knew personally, so I was very comfortable talking to her. I've never met this teacher and won't until the day before school starts. Her ped psych suggested preferential seating (away from windows and doors) and she is a very strong visual learner and had a difficult time learning from just telling her things, another accomodation she may need. He also suggested having her speech and language tested.

I keep hearing how important 1st grade is now, how much they need to learn during this year. I just worry she's going to fall behind or have a very difficult time. In our district you cannot hold a child back, even if the parent requests it, so she has to make it work.

All of these things stress me out. I do feel very fortunate that I have good friends that work at her school and give me great advice. They even took extra time to match her with the teacher they felt was best suited for her.

Her ped psych is trying to get a group together of families like us. One group for the kids to work on their social skills together and one for the parents to talk about things. I'm really looking forward to this. It will be nice to sit down and talk to others who are going through similar things.

Thank you to anyone who read through all this. It's just nice to get this out to people who probably understand what it is like.

Tami
Lilly (6) PDD-NOS

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-11-2010
Fri, 08-13-2010 - 11:19pm

Thank you all so much for your responses.

As of right now, the school does not know about the PDD-NOS dx. It's been a long road (which I've heard is common) getting here. We had an incorrect dx of ODD late last fall, but her teachers and I did not agree and it took me some time to find a dr locally that had good references. She was diagnosed a few months ago and her kindy teacher was aware, but there is nothing in her file yet. Her psych wanted to wait until she was 6 to start the testing for that age group. He's working on the report now and will have it either before school starts next Thursday or within the first week. I will be giving her teacher a copy as soon as I get it. So far his suggestions are preferential seating away from windows and doors and visual aids as she is lacking in her auditory learning skills.

So far Lilly is holding her own with what she has learned, but her kindy teacher is afraid that without some help, she will begin to fall behind.

I'm very fortunate to have friends that work at Lilly's school, ones that will tell me the best way to go about getting her the help she needs.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2006
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 2:22pm

Oh absolutely Heather. And I know there are some kids who are just a bit quirky or who are so high functioning they don't need the services, but damn school, don't look at me like it's just my parenting and my kids are tantruming, or they have no friends, or they're getting bullied and then say no, sorry, no IEP, there grades are too high.

My kids suffered for years because of that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 12:59pm

Thanks for posting this Lainie.

                                

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2006
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 10:05am

Okay I found it much faster than I thought I would lol.... Now I'm in Calif, and of course case law is the 9th cir, but there is a federal code in here that also talks about emotional, social needs etc....

2(B). Some categories of disability that qualify a student for special education require that the condition “adversely affect educational performance.” What does that mean?

Many schools evaluate whether a child’s condition has an adverse affect on his educational performance strictly on the basis of grades or the child’s scores on standardized tests. Although grades and, perhaps, standardized test scores may be one measure of educational performance, the law and the courts take a broader view. Especially when determining whether a child’s educational performance was adversely affected by the child’s emotional condition, the federal appellate court governing California requires that consideration also be given to a student’s need for behavioral and emotional growth. Although some students test well when taking standardized tests, the law does not require poor standardized test scores in order to find an adverse affect on educational performance. The courts have established that a child’s educational needs include academic, social, health, emotional, communicative, physical, and vocational needs.

Federal special education law also distinguishes between ���educational” performance and “academic” performance and establishes that “educational” performance is a broad concept. For example, children must be assessed by schools in all areas of suspected disability. Those areas are defined by federal regulations to include: health, vision, hearing, social and emotional status, general intelligence, academic performance, communicative status, and motor abilities. Academic performance is only one of the areas in which children must be assessed. Congress and the California Legislature could have used the narrower term “academic performance” when writing the definitions of conditions which would qualify a child under eligibility categories such as Emotionally Disturbed, Other Health Impaired, Orthopedic Impairment, Mental Retardation, Speech or Language Impairment, Visually Impaired, Hearing Impaired, Deaf. However, they did not. Congress and the California Legislature sued the broader term “educational performance” in these eligibility definitions. In addition to grades and standardized tests scores, schools must consider how a child’s emotional, health or other conditions adversely affect his non-academic performance in social, behavioral and other domains as well.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 10:02am
Virginia
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2006
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 9:57am

I sure can but I have to do some searching. I did have to hire an atty because my kids were getting good grades but melting down in front of the school and I couldn't get them in. They just denied denied denied until the Atty Showed up.

But now I know they can't do that to me anymore so I tell everyone I can lol. Give me a few hours to search and I will come back and post it k?

Not that it matters but what state are you in btw?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 7:22am

Can you tell me where in the law it states it. I have studied IDEA and NCLB, and I can't find where schools are required to help students who are already succeeding academically. I've looked in some of the Case Law too and haven't found anything useful. It would be useful in obtaining services.

The cost of an attorney, with no guarantee of success, is prohibitive. It is cheaper for us to take him to private social skill classes.




Edited 8/11/2010 7:28 am ET by tryingtoquit
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 7:20am

It sounds like, for your son, if he did not have those supports, he would not be doing well academically. I wasn't talking about being smart or not. There are many a smart children who can't succeed without intervention.

I am talking about a child who already is succeeding academically. At least where I live, a child who is currently succeeding academically will not qualify for a 504 or IEP.

My YDS qualifies because he has dyslexia and dysgraphia. He needs his IEP interventions to succeed. It has nothing to do with his intelligence. However, because my ODS (with a high functioning ASD diagnosis) has always done well in school, he does not qualify. Even though he has had major social problems. Since it did not interfere with his access to and success in his education, no 504 or IEP was granted.




Edited 8/11/2010 7:20 am ET by tryingtoquit
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-2006
Wed, 08-11-2010 - 1:39am
My district did the same thing. Schools will try to say they don't qualify for an IEP due to grades or passing from grade to grade, but the law says they also have to help kids with social, emotional and functional skills.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 08-10-2010 - 7:42pm

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