Math Facts

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
Math Facts
13
Mon, 07-19-2010 - 11:47am

I've been trying to help my nearly 8 year old master multiplication facts for many months now. I'll admit to some lack of dedication in the beginning, but we've been working pretty diligently this summer, and it's just not sticking. Anyone have a program, plan, process that worked well?

TIA
Mary

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Sun, 07-25-2010 - 10:23am
I downloaded the sample chapter (3's) and we're going to work on it this afternoon. If that seems to be helpful we'll order the book. Thanks for the tip!
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Sun, 07-25-2010 - 10:25am

Thank you. I'll take a look on Amazon. That might be a good choice if it does division too. We have to start working on that next, and I don't think it will be nearly as automatic to her as her school seems to think.

Mary

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2008
In reply to: atomic_girl
Tue, 07-27-2010 - 6:46am

What kind of things does she memorize easily? songs and poems? (in which case her 'auditory' memory works better than her 'visual' memory, and you need to set them to music) Or does she remember 'pictures' (eg films, actions, etc) better? in which case a kind of visual prompt - eg maybe something as simple as a laminated card with the tables written in thick black pen that she looks at over and over til it's imprinted. Sometimes when I was in a play it was a lot easier to learn my lines once I had blocked my moves: ie had something physical to associate the answer with, so maybe you need a tables dance? Or she may remember them better if she understands the principles and relations underpinning them properly, in which case you need some proper maths tutoring/guide books, not rote learning.


She has my sympathy. I'm a university professor who is practically dysgraphic because my math skills were so poor (in part because I was taught it badly): I can quote you realms of Shakespeare but to this day ask me what 6x8 is and I am stumped. It still surprises me that my Aspie can give you a rundown of bizarre facts about different planets and solar systems, but cannot memorise a spelling list to save his life. Their brains really do work differently.


Kirsty, mum to Euan (11, Aspergers syndrome) Rohan (7, NT) and Maeve (4, NT)

"My definition of housework is to sweep the room with a glance"


"My definition of housework is to sweep the room with a glance"


Follow my blog on http://mumsnet.com/blogs/kirsteinr/


 

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