Math Facts

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
Math Facts
13
Mon, 07-19-2010 - 11:47am

I've been trying to help my nearly 8 year old master multiplication facts for many months now. I'll admit to some lack of dedication in the beginning, but we've been working pretty diligently this summer, and it's just not sticking. Anyone have a program, plan, process that worked well?

TIA
Mary

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2008
In reply to: atomic_girl
Tue, 07-27-2010 - 6:46am

What kind of things does she memorize easily? songs and poems? (in which case her 'auditory' memory works better than her 'visual' memory, and you need to set them to music) Or does she remember 'pictures' (eg films, actions, etc) better? in which case a kind of visual prompt - eg maybe something as simple as a laminated card with the tables written in thick black pen that she looks at over and over til it's imprinted. Sometimes when I was in a play it was a lot easier to learn my lines once I had blocked my moves: ie had something physical to associate the answer with, so maybe you need a tables dance? Or she may remember them better if she understands the principles and relations underpinning them properly, in which case you need some proper maths tutoring/guide books, not rote learning.


She has my sympathy. I'm a university professor who is practically dysgraphic because my math skills were so poor (in part because I was taught it badly): I can quote you realms of Shakespeare but to this day ask me what 6x8 is and I am stumped. It still surprises me that my Aspie can give you a rundown of bizarre facts about different planets and solar systems, but cannot memorise a spelling list to save his life. Their brains really do work differently.


Kirsty, mum to Euan (11, Aspergers syndrome) Rohan (7, NT) and Maeve (4, NT)

"My definition of housework is to sweep the room with a glance"


"My definition of housework is to sweep the room with a glance"


Follow my blog on http://mumsnet.com/blogs/kirsteinr/


 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Sun, 07-25-2010 - 10:25am

Thank you. I'll take a look on Amazon. That might be a good choice if it does division too. We have to start working on that next, and I don't think it will be nearly as automatic to her as her school seems to think.

Mary

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Sun, 07-25-2010 - 10:23am
I downloaded the sample chapter (3's) and we're going to work on it this afternoon. If that seems to be helpful we'll order the book. Thanks for the tip!
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Sun, 07-25-2010 - 10:21am

We tried that! Unfortunately it set off her vestibular system and she got nauseous pretty quickly. She likes her computer games more static (civ iv, zoo tycoon). I have had some luck with another game that's more puzzle like, but I can't remember the name. Something to do with Zeus, because mythology was her thing most of last year.

Mary

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-09-2009
In reply to: atomic_girl
Fri, 07-23-2010 - 12:59am

I've heard good things about a game that can be bought called Timez Attack. My DS tried the free levels and liked it, but we went with the Math Blaster game for his age group (which he, of course, didn't like) and I didn't want to spend more money on educational games so we didn't end up ordering it. Here's a link to a site where it can be ordered and which also offers a trailer:

http://www.bigbrainz.com/

Here's the page with the pricing guide:

http://www.bigbrainz.com/Pricing.php

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-26-2008
In reply to: atomic_girl
Thu, 07-22-2010 - 10:03pm

We bought a handheld electronic game called "Flashmaster". It is used to learn math facts and it has sounds and you can try and beat your "score" and it is fun. It doesn't feel like they are doing "school" but playing a game.


It is a little pricey...I think it was about $35, but was worth it for us.

Katy

Katy   Blessed mom of 6 girls, youngest Sarah born May '07 with hypotonia, vertical nystagmus, developmental delays

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Tue, 07-20-2010 - 7:01pm

You need Times Tables the Fun Way. I found it online when my dyslexic dd could not get the times tables and it helped my aspie son too. There are stories for each one and a visual aid. Like for example, the one I remember the most was the two brothers who were sixes walking through the desert and they became very "thirsty-sixes" = thirty-six.

It really worked well for my kids - it's online somewhere, try googling times tables the fun way. (Amazon has it, or you can get it directly from city creek press).

PS (I am also a math instructor, so it comes recommended in more ways than one - and no, I don't own stock in the company...LOL)
Good luck,

Terri, mom of 14.5 yo triplets in 9th grade - ds w/ AS, 1 dd/ dyslexia and 1 dd gifted
Terri, mom of 12.5 yo triplets in 7th grade - ds w/ AS, 1 dd/ dyslexia and 1 dd gifted
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Tue, 07-20-2010 - 3:44pm

Thank you. We'll keep working at it. She's pretty good with memorizing words (lines for a play, a poem) and facts about her interest of the moment. However, the math stuff is always tricky. I'm pretty sure she never learned the "addition facts", but instead figured out how to count quickly. Now that I think about I might try having her type out all the "problems" using words and see if that helps.

Thanks again,
Mary

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Tue, 07-20-2010 - 3:40pm
Ours is going into 3rd grade and has an unusual school situation, where this is pretty much the normal progression. The school is half classroom taught, and half home school. Because of sensory and attentional issues, she gets most of her serious instruction at home, although she's first exposed to material at school, and we follow the school's curriculum. Most of the time it works well, but this sort of thing makes me in over my head.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2003
In reply to: atomic_girl
Tue, 07-20-2010 - 9:58am

Dang. That's what I was afraid of. I was hoping there was something I was missing. I'm constantly surprised at the different ability levels across her academics. I expected it other places, but not in her school work, for some reason. It always surprises me when she sails through some material that I expect to be difficult, but then stops cold for 9 months on a task that seems relatively easy for me.

Thank you. We will keep plugging away.

Mary

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