More questions-------

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
More questions-------
4
Sat, 07-19-2003 - 8:53pm
Now Asperger kids do not have a speech delay---correct? But do they have a "language" delay? More on the receptive side? Expressive side? Or both? Or none at all?

Holly

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2003
Sun, 07-20-2003 - 5:36am
Wow, Holly, you've been doing a lot of good research to come up with such a great question! I'm glad you asked it.

No speech delay for Asperger's, correct. But 'speech delay' is defined as a delay in the use of vocalizations and attempts to form words, even unique ones. However, many people with AS have language problems. Among these are pragmatic speech problems(both high and low end), lack of conversational skills, lack of verbal social reciprocation, inablility to form contextual understanding, etc. These language problems manifest as both receptive and expressive.

The most common discription of how a young Aspie talks to another is called 'the little proffessor'. This is when the child has a large amount of knowledge on, or a great interest(obsession) in, a specific subject. For instance, my dd, Jade, has an obsession for Cosmology. We often warn guests to stay as far away from the topic of science as possible if thye value their ability to think. As soon as you get Jade started she always finds her way to the topic of Cosmalogical Convergances. At that point she draws herself up to her full height and takes on a 'teacher's' tone of voice. She is now in lecture mode, and Heaven save the person who interupts her before she reaches her conclusion. She really does know a lot about the subject, but she has a hard time expressing what she knows.

My dh (AS) had no 'speech delays' but he still, at the age of 39, has a hard time expressing himself clearly and understanding others. Just today we ended up in an agrument over something he had said and at one point he stopped and said "Oh! I did it again. I had an Aspie momment." He was, of course, reffering to the first thing he said that had orriginally upset me.

You see, Aspies, whether with Asperger's or some other HF-ASD, take language in it's most litteral and concrete forms. When they say a word they usually mean it by it's most litteral deffinition, not the way it's most commonly meant. My dh sees the word 'ignorant' not as an insult toward another, but as an accurrate discription of a person who is uneducated. And he isn't wrong in this because that's what the word ignorant meas, uneducated. He knows full well that most people mean it as an insult, but he doesn't.

Okay, I've rambled again, sorry. Hopefully some of the other board members will post examples of the language problems thier children and spouces have had so you can get a clearer picture. I think we have just about every language delay represented here. There are many, many others.

Glad to see you again. :)

Peace,

Candes

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 07-20-2003 - 11:49am
I guess my son is too young to know for sure if he really is AS or not. The speech path--told us that he needs to be "taught" as if he had AS becasue of his language delay and social skills. But he never got dx as it--for now.

He doesn't have any 1-interest stuff yet. He just has all the language problems. We have alot of miscommunications. He's also just starting to realize that he can't get the words out that he wants to say. Or when he gets the words out--I will repeat what he means and he says--no, no. He's even told me that he can't talk. At least he's not having as many meltdowns anymore due to communication. Hopefully others will have more examples of their kids' language.

Holly

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2003
Sun, 07-20-2003 - 5:24pm
I'm with your ds' speech path. If he acts like an Aspie he should be taught like an Aspie, whether he turns out to be or not. It won't hurt him at all. Infact, I often have the thought that all kids under 6 should be approched like Aspies. Why? because in young children on the Spectrum we formally teach them all the little things 'normal' kids seem to absorb, social skills and baser language. I've met entirely to many kids who, while basically pretty good kids, have zero understanding of interpersonal workings(manners) and tend to butcher the English language(or whatever their native language happens to be).

Yep, your ds is still too young for a confirmed dx os AS. And it may turn out that he has something like dysraphazia, which would make problems for him socially as well as with his use of language. But somehow I doubt that this is what your ds has. We like to remind people that only an autism specialist can rule ASD out. Same goes for Dysraphazia...only a speech pathologist can rule it out. And since it's your ds' speech path that isthe one saying his problems seem like AS I'm willing to bet that the path has already ruled it out. If I were you I'd go with te recommendations of the speech path for now. At your ds' age treating him like an Aspie isn't going to hurt him one ioda. Keep us informed on how things are going. I, for one, am interested to see how things develope.

Peace,

Candes (here, have a cup of chocolate, it helps replenish the braincells after doing a mountain of research, LOL)

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 07-22-2003 - 10:59pm
What on earth is Dysraphazia?????

I've never heard or even seen that word before. Can you explain it alittle bit please?

Thanks Holly