need aspie kindy goals

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Registered: 09-03-2004
need aspie kindy goals
3
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 6:13pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 04-19-2010 - 7:16pm

In addition to having 2 teens with ASD, I also teach a K-2 Autism class so I can help you with goal wording.

What are his social skiil levels? That makes a huge difference. I can give you some ideas of goals that I write for my class but they are more significantly autistic typically. I have a couple higher kids and they are K level. Here are some examples,

By annual review 2011, in the context of a developmentally appropriate social activity with at least 1 peer(ex. building blocks, completing puzzle) K will participate in the activity for at least 10 minutes while referencing the peer a minimum of 3 times with no more than 1 prompt in 4 out of 5 opportunities as measured by staff data collection/observations.

By annual review 2011, during small group activities K will initiate a social interaction and ask a question or make a comment with a peer or adult without prompts in 4 out of 5 opportunities as measured by staff data collection and observation.

Give me some ideas of what you want him to work on and I can help you with what the goal should say.

Renee

At the tree Tunnel

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-03-2004
Tue, 04-20-2010 - 4:52pm

Those are great. He doesn't interact with peers.


I know I need a greeting goal, and a back and forth conversation goal, also one that has him initiating a conversation.


I would like him to be able to retell something he did at school but I'm not sure if that could be a goal.


I think I also need some behavioral goals to deal with transitions. Stoppina liked activity or starting one he doesn't want to do.


Do any of yur students use a visual plan of their day?


Thanks, Theresa

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 04-20-2010 - 10:09pm

I have had students with goals in both of those areas.

For the first you can start with a simple retelling events type goal and the teacher/speech path can make him a little graphic organizer to help him retell about his day. I have done this before. Even a little velcro schedule (first next last) and they put on some basic pecs pictures to help prompt him what to say (a book, friend, and art picture) and they rehearse with him retelling what he did. Can even start with just one picture. I worked on this skill with my own children through the use of structured routines and questions after school. I taught them a few specific question and asked those questions every day. I also as we got older made a game out of it where I would aask Mike when I picked him up how many questions I could ask him about his day and I picked VERY specific concreete questions. This helped teach him how to do that.

One thing I did want to note is that many of these social goals sometimes could be written by the speech path who would also collaborate/consult with the teacher for implementation because much of it is social language problems.

retell events (depends on his baseline) - By annual review, when given visual supports, K will be able to retell a recent event by describing what happened first, next and last with no more than 1 prompt as measured by.....

Behavior - By annual review, when given a visual/verbal count down K will end preferred activities and begin non-preferred activities without negative behaviors (as defined by his specific behaviors) with no more than 1 prompt in 4 out of 5 opportunities per day for 2 consecutive weeks as measured by.....

By the way there are a number of strategies that can be used to help with those behaviors but I wouldn't want to be too specific on what strategies would be used in the goal. It really isn't appropriate to put specific strategies into a goal mainly because you don't know what would work and sometimes you discover something that works better and want to make a change. You can't if it is written into the goal.

However I did state given a visual/verbal count down to state that some kind of strategy would be utilized and these are typically what is needed for that kind of thing. A great strategy is a visual timer which can be as easy as the numbers 1-5 on a velcro strip and you remove one number at a time to show him the passage of time and how it is ending soon.

At the tree Tunnel

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