Opinions please :)

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Opinions please :)
8
Thu, 10-16-2003 - 9:02am
I went to a parenting seminar last night on Autism. There was a doctor as guest speaker. His official title is Ph.D., C. Psych. He said he is a Neuropsychologist. Anyway, I asked him about Asperger's and he said that alot of professionals think that

Asperger's shouldn't even be used as a diagnosis. He said that it should only be called High Functioning Autism. What do you guys think? :)

Susan

There are 4 things you cannot recover.
1. The Stone.......after the throw.
2. The Word........after it's said.
3. The Occasion......after it's loss.
4. The Time.........after it's gone.
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Registered: 11-05-1998
Thu, 10-16-2003 - 10:32am
Well, I've read that Tony Attwood has said that the only difference between Asperger's Syndrome and high-functioning autism is the way they're spelled. Whether or not that's true, I prefer to use the term Asperger's Syndrome, because it doesn't have all of the negative "baggage" that the word "autism" carries with it. However, if someone wants to know more about AS, I usually tell them that it's on the high end of the autism spectrum.

Most people don't call autism "Kanner's Syndrome," although I have heard people call it "Kanner's autism" to distinguish it from Asperger's Syndrome.

When Chris was diagnosed five years ago, his psych didn't want to use the phrase "Asperger's Syndrome," because he said it was the "flavor of the month," and was just a fad in diagnosis. Now, after 5 years, I think he would think differently.

Elizabeth

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Thu, 10-16-2003 - 10:58am
Well lots of different professionals have differing oppinions on this one. Many are moving to using the term autism spectrum disorder to cover all of these milder ASD's because there is so much overlap. For instance, my dd has had diagnosis of asperger's, PDD-NOS, ASD, and HFA, so which is right? She is still the same girl with the same symptoms, it just depends on who is doing the diagnosing at the time.

Personally I like moving to a ASD classification instead. My first reason is that each of these kids on the milder end are so different, most don't fit a certain one of the diagnosis to a T and many overlap, yet they are all related so ASD seems a better diagnostic term.

My second reason is treatment. There are many places out there that still don't consider AS or PDD as requiring treatment like "kanner" autism and as such many of the children with AS or PDD can miss out on neccessary services. I have heard of professionals using the term Autism for a child who they normally would diagnose with another ASD just so the child would qualify for services. For some reason simply changing the diagnostic term to ASD seems to make getting services easier. I know it is true for regional center clients here in CA. There is even research out there and recomendations by the national association of sciences that all children on the autism spectrum, regardless of diagnosis, recieve early intensive treatment and yet many districts and service providers have not caught up with that.


Renee

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Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 10-16-2003 - 1:26pm
I'm kinda new to this, my dd received an Asperger's dx a few months ago. We brought her in for an eval to see if she had PDD-NOS or HFA, and never even considered Asperger's as dd had severe articulation delays when she was younger, so we were a little suprised. Our school district doesn't consider Asperger's to fall under the autism category, so dd's classification is "Other Health Impaired."
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Thu, 10-16-2003 - 1:38pm

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Thu, 10-16-2003 - 1:54pm
For the purposes of school, Chris is classified as "autisically impaired." I hate the way that sounds, but if that's the label that gets him the best services, I'm all for it.

Elizabeth

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 10-16-2003 - 2:32pm
I think it goes to show just how different the medical professionals opinions are in an area that hasn't been studied sufficently. With the medical community broken into groups for and against AS, it makes it incredibly hard for parents to feel that they have been given the correct dx. To get good services, you need a specific dx and that is so hard on families. My wish is for the medical profs to learn more about autism so that in the future, the newly diagnosed high functioning kids get better help.

Larissa

Larissa
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 10-16-2003 - 6:12pm
Same here. Cait is classified at school under autism and as autistic by the regional center. Without the autistic label for Regional center she would not recieve services. We actually had to go to appeal to get that classification because she was denied at first based on her diagnosis of asperger's. Potato/potatoe what difference really.

Renee

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Registered: 06-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 2:13am
When Ds was diagnosed with PDD-nos the doctor said to use atypical autism. I usually use both "pdd-nos or a typical autism". It helps when med techs are looking at you like your'e from another planet. ;)

kirsten