parallel vs. cooperative play?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
parallel vs. cooperative play?
6
Mon, 02-09-2004 - 10:32pm

Ok, I have been looking all over the internet without much luck.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Tue, 02-10-2004 - 7:55am
Renee

I sent you an article via email off EBSCOS (sp). I hope I did it right, and you get it! Anyway, I'm sure the actual article isn't what you want per say, but there were a lot of great leads in the intro to other research articles dealing specifically with scales developed re cooperative play. It seemed to me the research started around the 1930's in this area.

Also, based on that intro, I'd say btw the ages of 3 and 4 there seems to be a shift from parallel play to more cooperative play.

I wish I could cross reference those articles for you, but Linnane has pneumonia again, so I imagine I will be doing a lot of cuddling and holding today of the chi-ca.

Sio

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 02-10-2004 - 7:50pm
Hi Renee, As a nurse for 25 yrs. & as a mom for 15 yrs. I would say that pre-k age 4 is when co-op play evolves. My Sarah never did have co-op play. Her teacher in pre-school brought it up to me. I just thought she was imaginative because all she did was pretend LION KING all day. Even my peds didn't seem concerned @ the time. I knew something was up 'cause my other dd was more social @ that age. How old is Dave now? He's your youngest correct? BTW Do you have any of your kiddos signed up @ the San Diego Regional Center? I'm looking into STAR program for Sarah in a high functioning group. They hold the group every Mon. down in S.D. & in the community every other Sat. Do you know about this program at all? Let me know 'cause I need to get her started in a social group soon. The school psychol. called & said she is going off by herself again & not interacting... Take Care~ Mary Ann
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2003
Tue, 02-10-2004 - 8:35pm

Renee,


According to the APA cooperative play can be seen as early as 1yo and should be in full evidence by 3.5yo. A child under 6yo will still exibit more instances of parallel play as opposed to children over 6yo. But between 3.5 and 6 a child should be able to 'play with peers easily in a cooperative setting when encouraged'.


Does that help any?


The fact that Dave doesn't cooperative play at 4 is a little concerning, but he could very well be a late-bloomer... yeah, and Jade is more popular than Barbie. If ASD or any other Social/Behavioral Disorders didn't run in your family I would say don't start worrying just yet. But they do, so I would say keep an eye on him and list down traits as they occur. It's still a bit early for an AS dx, but it doesn't hurt to get the proverbial ball rolling and be prepared if the autism specialist comes a calling.


HUGS, Sweety, I'll be thinking of you guys.


Peace,

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Tue, 02-10-2004 - 8:44pm
Renee,

According to play norms, parallel play begins in the toddler years. Cooperative play begins around the age of 3 yrs. Cooperative play depends a great deal on being proficient in language and the ability to negotiate socially, and as such, it continues to increase from the age of 3 to 6 or 7 years of age.

Parten's norms, which are still accepted today were compiled in 1971. They may give you an idea of how much parallel and cooperative play is normal.

Unoccupied Onlooker Behavior 3-4 yr olds 19% 5-6 yr olds 14%

Solitary Play 3-4 yr olds 22% 5-6 yr olds 20%

Parallel Play 3-4 yr olds 22% 5-6 yr olds 23%

Cooperative Play 3-4 yr olds 37% 5-6 yr olds 43%

You might want to observe a class to see for yourself how your son differs from the other children. Some non-ASD kids just find large groups overstimulating and difficult to navigate. So I would also ask if David can engage in cooperative play for an extended period with one peer whom he knows well when he is alone with this one peer.

If he only does well with adults because peers are more egocentric and won't let him have his way as much, or if the adults are doing a lot to draw him out and keep the interaction going, this may indicate Aspergers.

David may also need more "down time" from large groups than other kids (a trait of highly sensitive kids). This can be true of kids who are non-ASD too.

Suzi

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 02-10-2004 - 8:47pm
Thanks for the reply.

Ya know, I am thinking of going with your earlier recomendation and will be asking the psyche this weekend about PDD-NOS. It looks like he will need a medical diagnosis to get services like I thought. I will know for sure tomorrow. But after this latest report and reading PDD info again, I can see the point. I guess I just wasn't expecting him not to be playing with peers.

Renee

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 02-10-2004 - 8:52pm
Yep, Cait is in Regional. I keep calling to get an intake interview for Mike then I keep chickening out. Just don't want to go through it again. Problem with regional right now is that soon they are threatening to charge parents the first 5 or 10% of their salary as a co-payment. So if you make a combined 50,000 a year, you will have to pay the first $5000 of your services.

As for Star, they finally just started one up in our area. However, for the older kids it is 3 days a week for 3 a shot. Doesn't leave much time for homework. Most of the kids are not as high functioning, though I heard they were starting a higher group.

I have looked into it, it just wasnt' the right thing for us. Cait is getting social skills group at school and my insurance just changed to one that does cover the friends clubs and some other social skills groups. Not a huge fan of Cynthia as you know, but it is better than nothing. I hear she is good with the kids, but it is the professional stuff and she thinks she is all that.

Let me know what you find out about the one down there. We are getting the same report of Cait at school. She is even "forgetting" her homework so she has to stay in a recess to do it. hehe. Funny girl.

Renee

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