Upset over a sandwich.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-24-2010
Upset over a sandwich.
2
Tue, 08-24-2010 - 3:29pm
My 9 1/2 yr old has aspergers. Today we had some running to do and everyone was hungry so we went to Subway and it was at the mall so it was crazy and busy. He wanted a foot long sub, and I sd no thinking portion size. We got home and he was upset and annoyed and I asked him what was wrong. And he just blew me out about how he wanted a foot long. And he is not a little kid, and i sd that the six-inch was too much and he said he could cut it in to pieces, and he cld eat the rest for dinner, but he wanted the foot-long. He is not a kid he is a pre-teen. I said no 13 is teen, preteen is twelve. He sd that a poster at target that said preteen 8-12. I said "Lord, no." lol
But he got so upset. Oh boy.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-20-2010
Tue, 08-24-2010 - 9:20pm

Oh, I feel like I'm "home" on this board! :)

Rachel, single mom to

Ingrid
Kale
Daniel
Reagan

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-2006
Tue, 08-24-2010 - 5:36pm

Yeah, I bet most of us here are familiar with that scenario.

Maybe, in his mind, there was something particularly special about having a foot-long sandwich. I can relate to that.

It reminds me of when I was 12, and my dad and I were driving across the country. We had planned on stopping in White Sands, NM. My sister had been there before, and said it was really neat because the sand was very white. Well, we arrived, and sure enough, the sand was white. But there were little shrubby plants all over the place, so instead of being a wide, endless vista of *white*, as I had imagined, it was white with green things all over the place. I remember getting this horrible feeling of shock and disappointment, and just sitting in the car and crying.

A foot-long sandwich is a special thing to have. A six-inch sandwich is just an ordinary thing.

That's what I'm thinking, anyway.

I admit, when we go out and have instances like this, I'm very likely to just let him get the 12-inch (or whatever the equivalent thing is). It's usually worth it to keep him happy, because when David's happy, everyone's happy. When he's not, it brings everything to to a grinding halt, and we all suffer.

I know, that's terrible. Still, I'm all for anything that keeps stress at a minimum. Of course, if my MIL is visiting, then it backfires, because although David is happy, we have to listen to her talk about how her other grandsons aren't so spoiled, etc! Sigh!

Evelyn