What about tics?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-26-2003
What about tics?
2
Fri, 05-02-2003 - 7:32pm
The other discussion about annoying habits was an eye-opener for me! My ds (7yo PDDNOS) started with a facial tic--opening his mouth wide and smiling for no apparent reason-- and I've been waiting before going to the doctor about it, but now I wonder if these noises and certain inappropriate words he likes to repeat are tics too. Do you go to the regular pediatrician about it first? Is there anything to be done about tics other than ignoring the behavior? (I can ignore for so long, but than I snap--which I know is bad).

Christine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 05-03-2003 - 2:34am
I went to my regular ped first, but my regular ped is a dev. ped and quite knowledgable. I would start there because it is generally quicker, but if your kiddo is seeing a neuro I would go there as well. It is not uncommon for kids with these kinds of difficulties to have tics as well. As a matter of fact, it is generally well known that many medications used for attending or ADHD (namely the stimulant class, which many kids with AS take as well) can increase tics in kids who are prone to them anyway.

Don't be alarmed by tics. 20% of typical kids will have what are called transient tic disorders, which are tics that last less than a year. Chronic tics (like Cait) are simple tics which last more than a year, but are only one kind of tic (forinstance only motor tics, but may be more than 1 motor tic, or maybe only 1 tic that lasts more than a year). Cait has multiple tics but until recently was not enough to be considered tourettes, although she is going to the neuro again soon and they will look into that more then. Tourette's, the most well known tic disorder, is when you have multiple kinds of tics at least, from what I remember, include 1 vocal and more than one motor including complex motor, that last more than one year and wax and wane. Most tic disorders resolve themselves before adulthood.

Ignoring is the first step. Stress increases tics, so if you can identify the stressors setting off the tics it may help to address those. There are some medications used, but typically they only medicate for tics if it is significantly interfering with the persons life. The medications aren't fullproof and sometimes don't work completely.

HTH

Renee

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-26-2003
Sat, 05-03-2003 - 2:53pm
Thank you for such excellent information!