What to include in an IEP

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-23-2004
What to include in an IEP
3
Mon, 01-30-2012 - 11:33am
We have had an IEP for our 10-year-old son, in 4th grade, for several years, but are wondering if there are things that we should include that we aren't aware of. He gets a bit of time in speech, took out OT, which was mostly for handwriting (handwriting is still terrible). It seemed better for awhile, and since they say he is "capable" of good handwriting there is no need to include it. He gets 30 minutes at the end of the day in the resource room to finish work, and can go out during the day as needed, also where timeouts are. He is able to use a computer for most of his writing work. Those are the main things. I guess I'm wondering what else can be offered to help. He is back on a behavior card, was doing ok without for awhile and this years teacher wasn't too keen on it. He has good days and bad days with it, whereas when we first started it a couple years ago it was like gold! We are adjusting meds, so I think it's partly due to that, but he has trouble focusing, wants to talk, has more meltdowns and lower frustration tolerance than in the past year or two. I know 4th grade is harder and I know the goal is to be to get him in as much normal classroom time as possible and not to "baby" him so how do we do that? He brings home way too much homework some days. Hardly ever a day that he doesn't have something. Wondering also what OT services other schools have available to help with attention? Is there a list of things available for IEPs? The teachers always say he is "capable" of more. Just frustrated right now. Friday wasn't a good day, and I felt like the resource teacher was frustrated too, haven't heard back from her yet. He is terribly bored with school work. How can they make it interesting for him and how much do you cater to their needs, for instance he is very hands on. Loves legos, paper crafts, etc., very creative. So how do you implement that into his learning? Thanks for any suggestions you might have.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-23-2004
Thu, 02-09-2012 - 9:28am
I have a couple more questions, as far as organization, how much help to you ask for and when do they need to take their own responsibility? Should he alone be responsible to make sure he brings home all of his work, or do any of you have someone to help? Also, what kind of help are schools required to do for subjects such as math? What role does a para play in your IEPs? How much can/should they help? We meet with his doctor tomorrow so hoping to change doses again and hoping that will help, so once the meds issue is resolved (for now anyway) perhaps some of these problems will be eliminated. Thanks, Lisa
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-23-2004
Mon, 01-30-2012 - 2:46pm
He doesn't do anything with OT right now, speech teacher has wanted to do some social behavior stuff, but everyone seems overworked as it is, and he is fine at times so they don't see the "need." We are in a very small school, low budget, etc., etc. His behavior card is really the only thing we see unless we get an email. He gets checks for language and effort, and I can't remember what the 3rd column is, gets a verbal warning, no points taken away for one check in each subject, and if he has 100% at the end of the day he gets to choose a reward, week of 100%s a bigger reward. It would be interesting to see what their perception of triggers is, that's a good idea. Thanks for your thoughts.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-21-2009
Mon, 01-30-2012 - 2:02pm

Hi!

I would love to find a list of things that are available but I bet schools would be SO unhappy if that happened! We'd be asking for so much more, lol. I always go to IEPs with a list of things I want, but I know I miss something each time. Or I believe them when they tell me there's nothing they can do yet I hear later about an option that someone else may have or I see at another school.

The first thing that I thought of was social skills. Does your son have anything in place to help with that?

We did ask before for less homework. We used to live in an area with a ton of homework as opposed to the little they have here and we had to tell them enough already. Over an hour for a third grader was completely unnecessary. By the time he was done, he was frustrated, unhappy, rushing and not learning, and it ruined his evening. I think kids need more time to be kids! Our kids also typically have more appointments and therapies that keep them busy so homework isn't their only concern at night.

Has he told you what he feels is setting him off? My son couldn't always tell me successfully what was bugging him, but sometimes he'd go into a rant and I'd have to write stuff down to then ask the school about. Some was legit, some was just his perception. Do you have a daily communication chart? We had one, and ideally, the teachers were supposed to keep an eye out for his issues and then see if they could see what precipitated them. I say ideally because we now homeschool; the teachers weren't good at it and while I know a lot of people that this has worked for, it's really dependent on the teachers to follow-through.

I would ask the OT what she's doing, what she's focusing on, and definitely ask for more. If he's a visual learner, hopefully they could work on modification. School needs to not be drudgework, you know?

I wish you luck, let us know how it goes.

Lily

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