Why do AS conserve energy? Don't try?

Avatar for jezpep
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Registered: 04-01-2003
Why do AS conserve energy? Don't try?
10
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 1:20pm

Hello, finally my second post here! I'm on a roll. My 8 y.o. son was dx'd in Feb. with ADHD, anxiety, Aspergers, PDD.

I've read and heard numerous times that Aspies generally conserve energy and may not put their greatest effort into certain activities. This is true for my son. Anyone know why???

He has no desire to ride a bike, no desire to learn to swing by himself, he is taking Taekwondo and while he says he likes it and wants to keep doing it, it is a lot of work and doesn't put effort into his moves, forms, etc. Of course he hates writing, that is like pure torture to him . . .

Anyone else in the same boat? Thoughts?

Thanks.
Molly

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Registered: 06-03-2006
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 4:02pm

i'm not sure he is conserving energy or not trying.


some of our kids have poor muscle tone and coordination. sports and physical activity can be difficult for them.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2007
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 4:38pm
My son sounds a lot like yours. He's eleven and has no desire to learn to ride a bike. The seat is uncomfortable, his legs aren't strong enough to pedal, he's afraid of falling and hurting himself,
Avatar for jezpep
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-01-2003
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 5:08pm

Thanks for your replies. What you both say, makes sense. I don't know many Aspie's so I'm searching for "what's normal". Jeez was that an oxymoron?

We have our meeting at school on the 4th for the decision on what education plan will be best for him. I'm curious as to whether someone will bring up the using computer idea to have him do his assignments.

Do your boys ever write their work? Or only in class? Will at some point writing become easier for them???

I'm so full of questions, but I'll stop here. :-)

Thanks!
Molly

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Registered: 02-24-2004
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 5:18pm

My son does this too.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2006
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 7:00pm

i realize

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-08-2009
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 7:36pm

Avatar for littleroses
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Registered: 03-28-2003
In reply to: jezpep
Wed, 04-28-2010 - 8:37pm
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2007
Thu, 04-29-2010 - 4:39am

My ds does almost all written work on computer. He's even allowed

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Registered: 01-07-2008
Thu, 04-29-2010 - 8:55am

I can give you some encouragement on the writing front because at 8 we couldn't get Euan to write anything, but now at 11 he has finally gotten to the stage where he can complete written assignments. For Euan it was a combination of things: a) sensory (physically holding a pencil was very painful and tiring for him) b) frustration (a *lot* of ideas that just don't come out fast enough made him just freeze up) c) perfectionism (if you can't do it exactly the way you want it to be done, there is no point doing it at all. etc. We got over this by having an IEP accommodation that he could use a data-writer (like a mini-laptop) for all written tasks - at first this was just as bad until he learned to type properly, then he just took off. This improved his confidence and his ability, which meant he re-engaged with the task and was willing to try handwriting again. He can now take notes and prepare handwritten tasks with extra time (and adapted pencils) and still uses the data-writer for all 'expressive' written tasks. (his grades have improved 100 fold, which helps a lot too).


On the 'not trying': other will have pointed this out, but there is often a complicated combination of things going on. Fear of failure (not understanding the task, not getting it completely right, being embarrassed by failing, not being the best). Not understanding the point of thet task (no immediate reward or benefit to them). Sensory issues (dizziness, confusion, balance, sensory overload, etc). Transition issues (changes in routine, in expectations, in rules, in environments etc). For each task you need to break it down into small, manageable chunks, address what the barrier is at each stage, and encourage them to move on. Euan now rides a bike (under protest and hates it), completes tasks, works in groups, participates in PE, eats his lunch with other kids, gets dressed/undressed with others, remembers his homework (well, ok, *some* of the time on that one!), can tell the time on an analogue watch, can spell, can throw and catch a ball

"My definition of housework is to sweep the room with a glance"


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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-26-2009
Thu, 04-29-2010 - 4:23pm
On the writing front... I homeschool, so while we do some writing I try to let him do lengthy assignments on the computer because typing is less stressful and the work he produces is higher quality.
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