new here, ?s about school

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2004
new here, ?s about school
10
Sat, 06-19-2004 - 5:55pm


My DS is 9 and was just diagnosed with ADHD. He also has a very high IQ and many of the social diagnostic factors of Asperger Syndrome (not enough to diagnose it--but many of the things I've read about it sound JUST like him). Never oppositional, just frustrated a lot. Has anxiety and depression.



How have your schools been supportive of educating your child(ren)? How have they let you down?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Fri, 07-09-2004 - 7:28pm
Oh! Yeah! That sounds like a great thing and I'm glad you got what you wanted!!! Sio
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2004
Fri, 07-09-2004 - 11:41am


Thank you to everyone for your responses. I won the battle in court yesterday to change schools and am very relieved. I feel that the team teaching at the public school will be much more beneficial to DS than working at the speed of the slowest student in his class at the charter school.

Next I have to set up counseling (for depression, anxiety and 'accidents') and a pediatric appointment for ADHD meds. I can't wait to meet his teachers. :)

xpB

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-23-2004
Wed, 06-23-2004 - 9:48am
Hi buttercup!

What a good idea about the info page for your ds. He looks (and sounds) so much like my ds, James. My son has been diagnosed with AS (Asperger Syndrome) but we are having all sorts of problems with the school administration and resource person because thay say... "well, come on, look at his incredible vocabulary" and "he is so smart" that he must know exactly what he is doing, and he is just being very manipulative. They keep saying that situations that arise at school have nothing to do with AS, though all the literature I read about it suggests otherwise.

He consistently gets the highest scores for math, his reading in English and French are O.K., though he does best when it's on a topic he is interested in.

He very much likes and wants to play with other kids, but he has a very hard time joining in group play. Also, when he joins in rough-housing, he can get carried away, and not seem to recognise when other kids have had enough, or are getting annoyed or anxious.

Reading the information about your son, and the trouble he sometimes has with writing, made me think very much of AS, and of a learning disorder often paired with AS, called dysgraphia. By the way, often AS kids can have ADHD concurrently.

You might like to look at the book "The OASIS Guide to Asperger Syndrome" by Patricia Bashe and Barbara L. Kirby. I've gotten it out of the library many times, and finally bought it online - hooray for e-commerce! Also, Anything written by Barbara L. Kirby or Dr. Tony Attwood would probably be useful for you.

http://www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/ is the link to the OASIS Online Asperger Support Web site, and Dr. Tony Attwood has a website too: www.tonyattwood.com.au/

Good luck to you, I'm still wondering whether to keep ds in same school, or switch him... with the right teachers, he has a chance....

Carol (ms_c_bluestocking)

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Tue, 06-22-2004 - 5:34pm
I think all people are like that. It just is part of what makes them who they are, on or off the spectrum. There is an old post by Candes that explains how it applies to a diagnosis, but I can't find it! I'll keep looking, and if I find it, I'll post it to you. But, often, there are characteristics that totally fit, then others that don't at all. And, not all folks with autistic characteristics end up on the spectrum. Also, as you can probably guess, an individual can end up being quite capable of having an independent life with varying degrees of characteristics.

Have you ever read any books like the ones by Tony Attwood? A lot of other people like different authors, but he put it is ways I "got". I think there are also some good older posts that are more specific to PDD books. You could do a search on that, too. Are there any books you really liked? I did not like Quirky kids, but it was for a personal reason. A lot of other people do.

Thank you for sharing his score with me.

Sio

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2004
Tue, 06-22-2004 - 2:27pm


He scores a 63 ... Mild PDD is what it said.

It is confusing; in some ways, he very much fits certain aspects in the diagnostic profile ... but then he doesn't fit others at all.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Sun, 06-20-2004 - 7:59pm
Buttercup,

Here is a link to the DSM-IV criteria:

http://pages.ivillage.com/cl-drendrewolf/id35.html

I got it off our community website. You might want to check it out as Candes, our fearless leader, has filled it with all kinds of stuff.

Another link off our website is to this nice assessment:

http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html

I'd be very interested as to how your son scores on this.

My last little tidbit here is to an article about a researcher who is looking specifically into why a person on the spectrum may have such unusual social issues:

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/baron-cohen.html

I've read books by Tony Attwood, Baron-Cohen, and quite a few others. I'm still searching for answers. At this point I know Liam has Liamism. And, of course, that is just fine by me.

HTH

Sio

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2004
Sun, 06-20-2004 - 6:43pm
I put together a page to reference "his story" because I'm posting on so many boards at once (Gifted, ADHD, 4th Grade, etc.) ... here he is!

http://www.freelief.com/kids/theboy.html

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2003
Sun, 06-20-2004 - 9:08am

Hello and welcome to the board.


Schools? Don't mention the war! ;)


My almost 6yo is about to enter his 4th school in September (this is

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 06-20-2004 - 12:23am
Welcome. We welcome Aspies, autistics, those nearly there, those with some traits and those just interested in it, and of course, Sio! (J/K Sio! Love YA!)

As for schools, well now that was a loaded question! I guess my experience with schools have been some of both. Right now my kids are finally in what I consider a very supportive school, though the district has been less than so on occasion. Of course it is my neighborhood school. They were in different schools until this year. Since my kids were not quite typical I was concerned with putting them in the typical school and though the district magnet schools were a better fit. I couldn't have been more wrong in my case. But I digress.

What are the issues you are having with your school? I have found that support have a whole lot to do with the administration and their attitude toward special needs. Next is the individual teacher. You can have the best IEP or 504 plan written in the world, but if you don't have an excellent teacher to implement it, it might as well be written on toilet tissue. This is coming from a woman who is a teacher by trade and married to one. There are some great ones and ones who should do something different with thier lives. I find my biggest push lately is getting not only the right kind of placement but the right kind of teacher.

How have they let me down. WELLLLLLLLL, That may take to long to write. I am guessing from your post that your district is not supportive because your son does well academically in school. They do not feel that he has needs that need to be addressed through the school because it is not affecting him "educationally". That just because he has a medical diagnosis doesn't mean he automatically qualifies for an IEP unless it is affecting his education, i.e. grades. Yep heard that lots of times from lots of people. My 8 y.o. 120 IQ son with no academic problems will be in a special day class for children with special needs next year. Special needs and educational affect of disability means a whole lot more than whether or not they get a passing grade.

My 2 cents.

Renee

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Sat, 06-19-2004 - 8:23pm
Buttercup,

Welcome to our little corner of the net! I'm very happy you've found us. When you have a kiddo with special needs, it is not easy, and can get so overwhelming. For me, this board, with it's happy, welcoming atmosphere, is my best support as I go down this journey. I hope you find that, too!

About schools, well, I've had it both ways. For K, I put Liam in the school my church had just opened. It was a long year and a half. The school was peppered with a few well meaning folk who really had no idea what they were doing or talking about. Liam floundered, yet due to their effort, I had a hard time seeing the forest for the trees. Then DH and I got to a point it was completely obvious that this was not a productive and nurturing situation for Liam, so we put him in our district public school.

In this environment, things have gone extremely well. Liam is dyslexic, and reading has been his first big struggle. Under the more experienced and nurturing environment of the public school, he just blossomed. So my point here is, you can get both. I've found I need to trust my gut. The IEP process was very productive for us.

Anyway, if you are having issues, and have questions, please know we have a lot of board mates who know a lot about this stuff, so ask as we may have some good insight.

Again, welcome!

Sio