Update on Therapy Sessions

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Update on Therapy Sessions
3
Wed, 11-21-2012 - 1:29pm

I don't have a ton to report, we've had three sessions so far and it seems to be going okay.  Matthew seems to be making some differences in how he handles his anger, although he still has a ways to go.  He had a tough basketball practice last night, wasn't taking the critisism from his coach well at all.  His therapist is supposed to show him more techniques on how to handle his emotions, and he really needs that help.

Does anyone have some tips to share on stress relieving tips or self-calming techniques?

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Registered: 08-04-2001
Mon, 12-10-2012 - 2:38pm

All I know about are breathing techniques.  People find different things that work for them. Some have a mantra they repeat in their mind that reminds them things are trivial. Others bring a funny picture to mind.

But a key is simply recognizing they are feeling that anger and need to do something. That's where the therapy and even workbooks come in handy. Here is a book I have heard about:  How to Take the Grrrr Out of Anger (Laugh & Learn)


www. It's Not Mental .com


Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Wed, 12-12-2012 - 2:40pm
Thanks for the info, Naomi. He has him working on positive affirmations to work on his self confidence. Still waiting for techniques on how to recognize the anger, I'll be looking for that book.

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Registered: 02-17-2004
Tue, 12-18-2012 - 8:31pm

Sorry this is late...

In our social group, the leader talks a lot about appropriate responses to situations.  They break it down into big problems/small problems; big responses/small responses.  She created some scenarios which were big problems and approriate big responses.  Big problems were items that usually needed an adult to help you out (our age group is 3-6yrs).  Small problems were things you can handle yourself.  They talked about how to recognize a problem (how it physcially felt - which differs for each person, thoughts that might come up, etc), and then how to develop a response. 

For big problems, they had a panda bear they cut out and glued on a popsicle stick.  Responses were seek help, tell an adult, etc. 

For small problems (most of the problems), they had a ladybug they cut out and glued on a popsicle stick.  They made a string with 10 beads on it to remind themselves to breathe 10 deep breaths.  They also made a cup to put the problem in a cup for a minute then look at it again.  Simple little things to remind them to take a moment then respond.

The biggest help that came from that was the conversational background I can reference when there is an issue.  Oh, I see there is a problem.  Is this a big problem or a small problem.  How is your response?  Is that a big response or a small response?  How can we address this next time?  Let's practice...

It's a work in progress still.  But it helps to walk them through the process and to recognize they can choose their response.  Another group with older kids made a toolbox of some sort with "tools" to use.  When they felt overwhelmed, they would take a moment to review the "tools" in their toolbox.  I saw a girl in OT use this one time.  She said she needed to stop for a moment and retrieved her toolbox.  She did not open it, but you could see the relief it gave her to physically have something she KNEW could help the situation.  There was something in that box she knew could help address whatever was going on.  She was able to pull herself through the situation. 

Maybe an idea.