Very Sad:(

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-27-2006
Very Sad:(
11
Fri, 03-09-2012 - 10:46pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2001
Sat, 03-10-2012 - 6:37pm

I understand how bad it feels when a child is sick and needing hospitalization.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-27-2006
Sat, 03-10-2012 - 6:43pm
Thanks so much! I mentioned my serious concern to the social worker today. They are talking about a two week program or day program where she'd be there for school. Regardless, she misses those weeks at her school right in the middle of the term...and the admin needs to know. I just feel these things leak out no matter what. My hope was she could come home on meds and outpt therapy but it seems that isn't a good option. I've thought about the religious route and think they'd be supportive, but I just feel ya tell one person, you've told your world:( Were your daughters helped by their time there? I really hope so...it is so hard as you know.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2001
Sat, 03-10-2012 - 10:05pm

Were your daughters helped by their time there? I really hope so...it is so hard as you know.

Yes for the older. No for the younger. For the older one it was a safe place to regroup, try something new (new medication) get educated about the medications and mood disorders, and get ready to start picking up the pieces of her life. She was a young adult when she was first hospitalized.

The younger one.... well... at least she got re-diagnosed (from mood disorder to bipolar disorder) and had a blood draw for lithium, which was a big deal because by then she was so phobic. It really depends on the hospital. The one she went to was not really set up for children with a real illness - with severe brain symptoms (she was hallucinating and had paranoia and psychosis). It was more for children with behavior problems. Her problem was not "behavior" - it was illness affecting brain function which affected thinking, mood and behavior. Big difference, imo.

So are you thinking of a residential treatment facility? We came close to that, but the meds kicked in.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-27-2006
Sat, 03-10-2012 - 10:48pm
What they are suggesting now is either a 2 week inpt facility that works with aggression and anger, coping at home and school along w meds. Or, and what I'm leaning toward, a partial hosp program where she'd be in school there normal school hours and home nights and weekends. These seems preferable to institutional living as she is the only one there not into drugs/alcohol/cutting or suicidal and I don't want her picking up any tips. They think mood disorder cause she doesn't have voices or hallucinations. To me she doesn't have the highs and lows of BP D/O. Mainly the anger and disrespect for authority more common in boys. I find the hospital unit totally depressing and it is said to be the best in town:(
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2001
Sun, 03-11-2012 - 8:24am

Oh... My younger dd was put with the younger children rather than in the teen unit. The teem unit was indeed full of kids with drug/alcohol/cutting/delinquency issues. I was soooooo glad they did not put her in that unit. She was on the cusp of being able to be put in either one, and probably because of her size and physical maturity level they put her with the younger children. Whew. Even so, her psychiatrist wanted her out ASAP because he was afraid it would do harm, but every case is different.

I know what you mean about how depressing some hospitals can be with lack of sunshine.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-27-2006
Sun, 03-11-2012 - 10:37pm
We didn't talk to the doc today but she tells us he said she might go home tomorrow. I hope he was stringing her along. The day program sounds like the best option, although that still leaves what to tell the school people. I really don't like the place she is in. Her roommate was talking to her advocate about all sorts of trauma she went through as a young child and it was so sad. Other than group times and outdoor time, they are pretty confined to their rooms. They aren't supposed to visit the other girls' rooms or walk the short halls. I'd want to leave too! I asked my DD about following house rules and controlling anger and she said, "I've learned my lesson" but I know it takes more than a few days to change.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2001
In reply to: cycling2006
Mon, 03-12-2012 - 10:22am

It sounds like in the younger children's wing they had at least a little more freedom.

As for what to say, perhaps less is better. Due to a family situation she is transferring to another school. That's what they told us - that it is the same as transferring schools. You do not need to tell anybody anything more than that. Kids do sometimes transfer to another school for a variety of reasons.


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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-27-2006
In reply to: cycling2006
Mon, 03-12-2012 - 10:39am
Wow complicated! Our DD will only be out 2 wks either way, so tough to say she went to another school and already came back. She said just tell em I broke my leg. Yeah, and you go right back to track, think not. One sort of positive thing: it has made me aware how much I use "crazy" or "nuts" in normal convo. "The traffic was crazy this morning" so I'm working on that. Thanks again:)
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-27-2006
In reply to: cycling2006
Mon, 03-12-2012 - 10:27pm

The doc said he didn't agree w yrs old ADHD dx when she was admitted.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2001
In reply to: cycling2006
Tue, 03-13-2012 - 10:57am

So the docs first thought the appropriate label for the behaviors and symptoms was "ADHD." And then they thought NO, and now it is back to ADHD. Some people wonder why why why do the "diagnoses" keep changing. It is because with the DSM, psychiatrists label sets of symptoms they see. The symptoms change, or - the symptoms they get a chance to observe, change - so the labels used to describe the sets of symptoms change as well. Often, the doctors really don't see what the parents get to see.

Wellbutrin helped my younger daughter a lot. It gave her more energy, helped her concentration, and improved depressive symptoms. We were stunned when a switch to generic was like she was taking nothing, so then we had to pay extra for the name-brand for years. Wellbutrin is supposed to be less likely to trigger mania in patients with bipolar than the SSRI antidepressants.

So... the doctor thinks that some of this is depression? Depression can manifest in irritability and aggression, too.

My younger daughter was diagnosed with over a dozen different things. Her GP said when a kid has that many different diagnoses it means the doctors don't really know what it is. For some reason, rather than feeling frustrated about that, it felt more reassuring. She'd been diagnosed with depression (MDD), ADHD, OCD, TS, Mood Disorder, Bipolar disorder, Psychotic disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and MORE!!!


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