ASD? :O

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2004
ASD? :O
17
Fri, 06-27-2008 - 11:22pm

I have a question for the moms who's kiddos have been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.....
Please bear with me, as I have no idea what I'm really asking.... Honestly I know very little about ASD.


How old were your kiddo's and WHAT was it that made them even think to "test" for this?
What was it they were doing that made them think it may be an issue?


Emma was seen by her eye doc today, who also deals with neurological disorders affecting the eyes (don't ask me, I don't know much about this either)....
She told me that she was concerned with some things she was doing and thought I should take her and have her seen for ASD and tested.


Basically, it was off the idea that her hand waving, watching her hands non-stop and waving to herself were of concern.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2006
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sat, 06-28-2008 - 9:19am

Hi Shanna,

I am sorry you have this new worry. I think I can speak for many that when delays are involved, ASD is a concern or at least its in the back of our minds. For what its worth, I think the eye dr. is hardly an expert in this area. If this is a concern please consult your neuro. or ped. When a fair of delays are involved, sometimes that can be confused as ASD. This topic is much talked about on the hypotoniahope board on yahoo.

As for the extra child support for Emma, I think it is fair to ask, and get. Extra therapies cost, as does meds and dr.s visits. You should have the monetary support that you need for Emma.

I know more moms will chime in that is more exp. than I am but I want to write to show support.

Thinking of you.

Mary

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2004
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sat, 06-28-2008 - 12:01pm

Thanks Mary!


Yeah, I know she is not the one to be trying to diagnose her at all!
She said she wasn't, also... Had just mentioned "You may bring it up to her doctor"


Hmmm, I would have thought her doc would have already done that!


Who knows... I don't need to stress about one more thing that may not even be an issue...
Poor thing has ENOUGH going on right now than to add one more thing.


The more info. I get about it... The more things may or may NOT add up to ASD.
Her infantile spasms that she had can account for most of what we see, as it is.
Not to mention hearing problems, vision problems, sleep apnea, etc. that if looked at individually could
make one suspect it.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-01-2004
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sat, 06-28-2008 - 12:51pm

Unless an ASD dx gets more therapy or adds clarity to the picture, there probably is not sense in pushing it at this time.

Kristine mom to

Elizabeth 8y, Ted 5y, Ben 4y autism, apraxia, nonverbal

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2004
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sat, 06-28-2008 - 1:01pm

Emma is 18 months old.


She does the hand flapping, waving to herself not others, stares at her hands/fingers for long periods of time.


She does make eye contact, but has no speech (says mamamamama but not towards me), has global sensory issues, does not point to anything.


The ONLY form of "speech" that she has is ASL, and that is only ONE sign she knows because she sees it repetitively and that is the sign for milk.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2006
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sat, 06-28-2008 - 1:46pm
Yeah, I know about the long road. But you are not on this road alone. Far from it.
xoxo, Mary
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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sun, 06-29-2008 - 12:26am

Well first, those partiucular issue you mentioned can be related to her vision issues and other delays. It does sound like a visual self stim but kids self stim for reasons that aren't autistic as well. If seh is delayed and has vision issues she may do that as well. My friends dd who is also down's did a lot of that at first but has grown out of it. She is a little older than your dd but doesn't have the vision and hearing issues so she may have developed out of it quicker.

That said, there can be a comorbidity between DS and ASD. I know there are some good articles about it out there somewhere. I will look and see if I can find them. I don't know specifically what to look for with kids with DS and comorbid ASD. I know we realized that my friends DD wasn't ASD also because she is so interactive and has GREAT joint communication which is typically not evident in autistic children.

Renee

Disney08

APOV on Autism
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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2004
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sun, 06-29-2008 - 12:34am

Thanks for SO much insight!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sun, 06-29-2008 - 12:50am

Comorbid just means when someone has more than one diagnosis. So they have diagnosis in conjuntion with another. SO if a child has Downs and autism they are comorbid or co-occuring.

I think it would be VERY hard to know at her age especially considering her other challenges but I do know that while self stimulatory behavior is kind of a hallmark of autism, autistics aren't the only ones who do it. Often it is to meet a sensory need and you have already said she has sensory issues (tactile issues along with the vision and hearing). PLUS her "stims" sound visual in nature and if she is low vision it kind of makes sense for her to do it.

Think about it. Babies learn through their senses particularly visual. Babies look at moving pictures, lights, mobiles, etc. and just love taking in the world. If you can't see all that but you can see your hand wouldn't you find it interesting to look at too? Wouldn't that meet the same need? I remember tripping out on moving leaves, how things looked when I used the swing, etc. when i was really little.

BTW, my very very typical 10yo dd used to flap like a mad woman up until she was about 3-4. to me it is a way WAY long shot to make an autism suggestion based solely on that. It could be hard to weed out because of her other issues. Never hurts to keep an eye out for it just in case. A cautious aware but not overly freaked eye.

Disney08

APOV on Autism
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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2004
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sun, 06-29-2008 - 1:04am

That is exactly how I want to approach this....with caution....yet just to keep an eye out.
I see no need (now that I know more) to freak out about it anymore.


Just difficult when you have some "doc" telling you "Oh my.....blah...blah...blah"


Thank you for the clarity.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: smurfsvillage
Sun, 06-29-2008 - 11:36am

I think you have a great way of looking at it and can I say your girls are just gorgeous! Emma looks like such a sweet doll. Gotta love her! My friends DS little girl is about the same age and that girl has stolen my heart in a big way so I have a special place in my heart for those little ones.

Of course Ellie is SPUNKY as all get out. Man she has a mind of her own. Are you finding that with Emma? She loves people and attention but she is only going to do something if SHE wants to do it. She has got one STRONG personality. i just love it.

I am also finishing my california spec ed credential (FINALLY). In my class this semester I am working on a big group project. I chose Downs as the subject of my project mainly because of Ellie. I will forward on to you any good resources that I get if you like. One of them was that downs/autism article. That was one of the other members in my group so I can get those from her.

Renee

Disney08

APOV on Autism
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