Anyone with SID kids who were Preemies?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Anyone with SID kids who were Preemies?
6
Thu, 10-09-2008 - 12:18pm

Hi ya! I am new here-- mostly seeking support as people look at me blankly (even doctors) when I mention SID. To make a long story short, my eldest is now 5.5. When he was 4 (his sister 2.5) I noticed his sister catching up on physical abilities. I also really noticed the difference between him and other 'normal' kids in his reactions to frustration, pain/injuries, clothing, smells, temperatures etc. I pushed and pushed and finally saw a Pediatrician who said yah, looks like SID so is SID. Don't need therapy, you are doing everything right and someone new would just stress him more. His first year of Juniour Kindergarten went well -- OT when assessing him caught NOTHING! In fact, he tested within or above normal ranges. Hey-- I already knew he was bright. Only 3 OT's in general area are certified administers of the Sensory Tests-- and really expensive or don't do private. I left it, just worked with stuff at home. Now he is older, in Senior Kindergarten and isnt really getting any better with coping skills. I am at my wits end. He FREAKS out when he gets the most minor scrape, cries if cannot do something, rocks while sitting on the couch still, throws a fit if I try to get him to go somewhere new or different (i.e. Beavers). Everything needs to be same old same old. I am a teacher, I know how kids are and I just want to make school easier for him socially as that is the area that his SID seems to compromise. Any suggestions for ways you have taught your kids to cope? Similar symptoms of kids who are outwardly normal seeming? Apparently Preemies (born 32 weeks or earlier) are more prone to this.....

Krista

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2007
Sat, 10-11-2008 - 11:06pm

My son, now 6 years old was a 27 week preemie. He was diagnosed pretty early and has been receiving occupational therapy since he was 9 months old for various issues. Luckily the hospital where he receives OT is very familiar with sensory problems and so we have been treating them since them beginning. I think without aggressive OT, my son would have alot more problems then he does now.

Scott is a sensory seeker and his problems manifested themselves early on as feeding problems, little reaction to pain, and his sensory seeking behaviors.

I think there is a definite connection between prematurity and SID. Preemies are born with underdeveloped neurological systems and exposed to intense stimuli while in the hospital.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-26-2007
Tue, 10-21-2008 - 6:46pm
CHristopher was a 32 weeker, and has SPD.
Avatar for ssjump
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-31-2003
Wed, 10-22-2008 - 10:46pm

I found the books "The Explosive Child" very helpful. It is not about SID in particular, however the word "Explosive" would be one of the best words to describe DS (5). The other book and training I found most helpful was "Sensational Kids." It is very parent/teacher friendly. These are where I look for ideas and answers to many problems I face at home and school daily. (I gave copies of both to our Special Ed teachers and classroom teachers who then shared it with the aides)

Good Luck!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-10-2004
Thu, 10-23-2008 - 8:54am
My DS is 7 and in 2nd grade. He was born a day late! His sister is 2 years and 2 weeks younger than him. When he was around 3 is when I also started to notice her catching up to him in the language area and other things as well. I too noticed many differences between him and other kids his age - cousins, friends kids, preschool classmates or just kids at the playground. He was diagnosed with SID at 3 1/2 by a private OT then we had him tested by our school and at Children's hospital. We got and IEP and he started at our city's preschool with OT and speech. He still has and IEP and still gets OT and speech at school. They just diagnosed him with ADHD back in March 08 at Children's. I agree that the SID does compromise his social abilities. The speech pathologist at school started using social stories with him last year and they do seen to help him. This year the guidance counselor at school is starting a social group for him and a few other kids. He is so much better than he use to be, the OT, speech and other things have helped him greatly but he still struggles and is so easily frustrated. He has come up with a few of his own coping skills to help him concentrate. They are pretty good at his school about using sensory aides too. You could try role playing with his favorite kinds of toys and act out different situations he has trouble with. ssjump mentioned some good books that you can read that might help a bit.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-17-2003
Sat, 11-01-2008 - 6:42pm

My Hanna was a preemie, but checked out healthy at birth and it wasn't until she started crawling that we noticed problems- rocking back and forth, shaking her head, and tuning everything out in the world around her when she would hear white noise. From that time on it only got worse from sensativities to touch, taste, noise, anxiety, and full blown panic attacks. Also has OCD.

I homeschool her because she would never survive in the outside world. Her pediatrician told me that she probably has SID, but nothing ever more was said on the subject and also because she is gifted the doctor tends to think it is mostly "quirks" that come along with highly gifted children.

We tend to keep her a bit sheltered at home and try to slowly venture out and teach her coping skills at home. I work dilgently to get her used to other children and the world around us and all it's busyness.

My husband understands because is also is profoundly gifted and has the so called "quirks" in a lot of areas too.

I find it takes almost every moment of my day to work with Hanna. I guess it depends on the severity.

I do baby steps with everything. It may take a short trip to the end of the block and back home. The next trip will be around the block and next a block further. We take the same routes in the store and every once inawile will turn down a different isle for the fun of it and I make a game of it. She seems to be responding well to that. Once in awhile I can get her to try just a tiny tiny bite of something new and have a trashcan there for spitting and juice immediately ready to go just in case the gagging starts. She has learned how to like a few new textures and foods this way. It is never forced upon her, but if she is having a good day I may be able to kind coax her into trying things.

It is not an easy life, but you make the most of it. You take one moment at a time. My life is pretty much my Daughter or else if I am not around or her Father it can make it hell for a few days while she works thru all the anxiety and crying.

I wish you the best and just remember it takes lots of time and a ton of patience. You can easily lose it. Any parent can with a "normal" child. With a child that has special needs or issues it is even more difficult. It seems every waking moment is on them and no time is left for you.

Baby steps and a good support system helps. I have yet to find anyone around this area that understands and family thinks I am crazy.

Trish :)

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Sat, 11-01-2008 - 8:42pm

WOW!!! Your daughter sure has an angel of a Mum! My bag is nothing compared to yours. I can completely appreciate where you are as I have worked with some children like that (I am a teacher) but my son goes to school and outwardly to observers appears 'normal'. He totally faked out the OT. What worries me the most is he too is bright, not in the profoundly gifted range which makes for challenges in itself-- but enough so that he is not being adequately stimulated intellectually at school but I wonder if the academics was upped if it would be more than he could handle. As is, he comes home wiped from the 'act'. He NEEDS the day off every other day (we have all day ever-other day Kindergarten here) just to space out. So--I enrich him at home in those 'teachable' moments and cut out at the first sign of stress.

How do you find Hanna's gross motor development? Coordination. Does she express tiredness over seemingly nothing in the way of exercise yet another moment play and play and play nonstop? It sounds like you do what I do-- prep them for outings, only do potentially contentious outings on 'good' days and funny how you begin to do it unknowingly. Did your doctor give medication suggestions? I am not a 'medicator' myself. Hence why I look for perhaps a nutritional alternative to buffer some of the issues.

How old is she?
Krista