I need quick help!

Avatar for fire_bug
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
I need quick help!
2
Sun, 01-11-2009 - 11:33pm

I hope someone sees this in time to give me some advice...

First of all, a quick intro... I'm Amy and my DD, Elizabeth is almost 6. Recently two OTs (her school OT and her private OT) did sensory profiles on her and both came back as "definite dysfunction". BTW, originally they weren't even going to test the sensory stuff at school but it was time for her 3 year eval updates and I requested that they test it. Elizabeth is in kindergarten in a special ed school. Tomorrow is her IEP meeting.

The most obvious sensory issues she has are poor balance/motor coordination, she's very distractible and fidgety and she's very sensitive to certain sounds. We were reviewing the draft of her IEP and her OT wrote a long thing about the areas where the sensory profile said she has definite dysfunction. The last sentence said that her teacher says she doesn't feel her sensory issues affect her classroom performance. I don't see how that can possibly be true since we've been hearing since preschool that they have a hard time getting her to focus and she's constantly distracted, etc. How can her sensory issues NOT be affecting her classroom performance?

I'm just wondering if anyone has any ideas for how we can get through to them that Elizabeth needs more OT help (we had to fight to increase her OT from once a month to twice a month) to succeed in the classroom. Her private OT (who she has been seeing since October) has shown a number of times that if she gets Elizabeth "warmed up" with a sensory activity like jumping on the trampoline or bouncing on a ball, she will attend to tasks she's asked to do much better. I'm starting to feel like they're writing her off, even though we feel that she is capable of so much more if we can just get her the right support.

Any suggestions?


Photobucket





babies




Photobucket
Avatar for fire_bug
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Mon, 01-12-2009 - 6:18pm

Thanks for your response. It actually ended up being a fairly productive meeting and I'm fairly happy with the results.

They still won't increase her OT. That annoys me, but I'm OK with it because my main goal was for them to incorporate sensorimotor activities into her routine and they added that in the accommodations section. I don't particularly care who does it, as long as it gets done. Her private OT has observed a number of times how she'll actually sit and focus for a decent amount of time if she warms up with some sort of movement activity. I had her read over the draft of the IEP and she gave me some suggestions for what to ask for and how these thing relate to her education. I was expecting more of a fight but we got much better results by telling them "this is what works for her", instead of just asking for more.


Photobucket





babies




Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-19-2006
Mon, 01-12-2009 - 10:31am
My now seven year old had the same issues. I had to fight and fight to get her any help period. I ended up saying you know what if you can deal with it then don't come to me and say I didn't try. I would go into the IEP meeting and tell them what you feel would help your daughter. I'd even offer to come in and help etc. I hope this helps and ((HUGS)) just know it does get better.
Photobucket

PhotobucketPhotobucket


PhotobucketPhotobucket


Photobucket