SPD not included in DSM

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
SPD not included in DSM
2
Mon, 01-07-2013 - 3:52pm

How do you feel about SPD not being included in the latest edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual?  You can read more about it here

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-18-2005
Thu, 01-10-2013 - 8:07am

A lot of professionals seem to believe that sensory issues are usually a component or symptom of another diagnosis.  When a kid is labelled "SPD", it's usually b/c they haven't been able to tease out what that true diagnosis is.  Hypotonia is the same way.  It's a description of a symptom, not it's own disorder (ironically, hypotonia and sensory issues are often co-morbid).  My sensory kid has finally been determined more or less conclusively to have dyspraxia, causing the hypotonia and sensory issues.  I know others who have sensory together with, for example, ASD.

Gwen

Gwen

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-17-2004
Mon, 01-14-2013 - 1:46am

I've also heard that it is co-morbid.  It's true for us.  We are SPD and ASD.  That being said, the SPD was clear much earlier than the ASD was.  As in 2 years earlier.  Without the SPD diagnosis, we would would not have been able to start OT so early.  So I understand why they are removing the diagnosis.  I am concerned though about how they plan to get SPD treated if they cannot figure out the actual diagnosis.

I have to be honest here because I know you will understand.  The SPD diagnosis was beneficial not only for insurance purposes and getting entry into OT.  It also eased ME into the ASD world.  Without the SPD diagnosis, I would have continued to think the sensory issues were related to giftedness and personal preferences and not started OT.  We literally started OT around 27 months of age.  Should have started sooner, but that was a tough phone call for me to make.  The OT noticed the muscle tone not developing as it should and started working on that too.  If she had not been so aggressive with it at such a young age, I'm convinced the very mild dyspraxia we see would be moderate like everything else.

I don't particularly care about the label they choose to use.  I do care IMMENSELY about the services the kids need and getting the right ones to them as soon as possible.  I also care about how insurance is going to use this.

Karen