Nonverbal Learning Disorder

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-01-2003
Nonverbal Learning Disorder
38
Tue, 12-02-2003 - 10:59am
Hi! I am looking for other parents of children with Nonverbal Learning Disorder. My nine year old son was diagnosed with NLD and I am finding that it is fairly uncommon. Even the teachers are not that familiar with it.

He is currently in a blended classroom and receiving OT. He is doing very well with this set up and seems to be OK academically, but there are still things we struggle with. For example he still can't tie his shoes or ride a bike. On the other hand in some areas such as reading, spelling and vocabulary he is way above grade level. We are learning how to handle his "quirks", like needing to verbally map out exactly where we are going when in advance so there are no surprises to freak him out!

I was wondering if there is anyone out there who might want to share experiences and suggestions. Thanks!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2003
Tue, 12-02-2003 - 10:22pm

Hi,


Welcome to the board.


Have you read the book "Bridging the Gap" ? I have it somewhere and I cant find it to mention the author's name

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-01-2003
Wed, 12-03-2003 - 9:17am
Thanks for the suggestion. That is not one I have heard of and I will look for it. What on earth is coddle??

CJ

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2003
Wed, 12-03-2003 - 2:16pm

ROFL!


Coddle is a native dish of my home town; Dublin.


It is a kind of stew made with sausage links, bacon, onions, hard cider and potatoes.


probably an acquired taste...


-Paula

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-01-2003
Thu, 12-04-2003 - 12:22pm
Sounds like comfort food at its finest! We should all have something we are good at and proud of! Thanks
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2003
Thu, 12-04-2003 - 10:51pm

Hi,


I was tryign to find that book, because your post reminded me I must return it! I did think of something therein, however: It mentioned that NVLD was

-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-01-2003
Mon, 12-08-2003 - 9:40am
Hi Paula

Actually I did know that. I have a friend who's stepson was diagnosed with Auspergers last year and we have found many traits in common (at least as far as the motor skills are concerned). I have ordered the book you suggested and am looking forward to reading it. Thanks. Have a great holiday!

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-08-2003
Tue, 12-09-2003 - 5:28pm
Hi! I am new to this board (and to parentsoup). My child was diagnosed with NonVerbal Learning Disorder about a year and a half ago. His main problem is fine motor skills, writing neatly for an extended period of time is impossible for him, he cannot tie his shoes well, he can ride his bike but he was slow learning to do so. He has an occupational therapist that works with him twice a week as well as a special educational teacher to help him keep up with his writing assignments and math. He also had some abnormal little quirks (waving his hands infront of his face, making weird noises, "being in his own little world") but the medicine we now have him on for ADHD has really gotten rid of most of them.

He is now 10 years old and in 4th grade. He is reading on a 7th grade level, but he spells on a 1st grade level. He is on grade level in math, and above level in science and social studies. The past four months have been amazing to us, we have seen many positive changes in him. Learning to keyboard and use Alphasmart has opened a whole new world for him and his peers think he's cool because of all the technology he uses. Its not easy for us. I had to quit work so that I could be home to help him with school work. Left to his own devices, a typical night of homework would take him 2-3 hours, which is not fair to him. I have a set of his text books at home so that I can create worksheets for him when he needs to copy problems from the books and so I can help him better understand what is being taught. My hubby and I let him write until he gets tired or really sloppy and then we transcribe for him. I have special paper for him to do math problems on if he needs it (to keep numbers aligned). His teachers are great and are very supportive of our efforts.

Lisa

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-01-2003
Fri, 12-12-2003 - 12:11pm
Hi! Wow - I have goosebumps reading your post. You know my world!!! Everything you said sounds so familiar. The handwriting thing is such a huge issue. Please tell me more about Alpha smart and how you taught him to keyboard. The school has told us that they would allow him to use computer (even suggested that they would provide a laptop), but I cannot get him to learn to keyboard. We, too, are exhausted fromt he long nights of homework. This year's teacher has been a godsend and the changes in him have been pretty amazing. We know that certain things will always be a struggle, but every time we get over a hurdle is such a victory! My ds had some "nervous tics" or at the very least behaviors that seemed to be connected with anxiety that have mostly gone away since we switched schools and got him in a blended classroom. He still has an "eye thing" that drives me crazy! LOL! I would love to talk more with you. I'm sure we have a lot in common! Do you know any other children with NVLD?? I don't and no one has ever heard of it so I am constantly explaining. Thanks for your post!

Connie ( Mom to Jake, 9 and Sam, 5)

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-08-2003
Fri, 12-12-2003 - 9:08pm
Hi Connie! I am glad to be of help!! Matt's not really good at typing yet, but we're working on it. I got him the computer game Jumpstart Typing, which he really likes and it makes learning the keyboard fun. His AlphaSmart is provided through his school, but he can't take it home. It is the size of a notebook with a keyboard and a little screen. He can take notes, or write reports and sentences on it. It corrects his spelling for him by suggesting words as he types. It can then be connected to your computer and his work can be downloaded and printed. Here is the website address if you'd like to look: http://www.alphasmart.com.

I decided when Matt was diagnosed that I would have to be the one to help educate his teachers since it is so unheard of. I did a lot of research online and found some articles on teaching NVLD children and their general traits. I put copies of them in his main folder at school as well as offer them to his teachers if they need them. I have developed more of a "Team" approach with school. Granted, I have an AWESOME public school system here that gives us sooooo much support. His regular and special ed teachers and I talk at least once a week (just touch base or more if needed), I talk to his Occupational Therapy teacher at least once a month. His special ed teacher has a class of 6 kids (Matt being one of the six) she keeps after school for a half an hour once a week to help with phonics and word skills. We feel very comfortable sitting down together and "brain storming" on ways to accomodate his needs. I have a big notebook I call "Matt's Educational Resouce Book" which I keep worksheets I have found, or articles I have found which I think may help. I also have all his neurologist reports, IEPs and teacher communications in it, so it is all right there when I need it. I guess it all sounds a little neurotic, but you can feel so out of control when you child is floundering and I guess my way of coping is to educate myself and organize it to death. I try not to be a b----- to the teachers or be "in their face". Most of them appreciate the fact that I go the extra mile. I've had one teacher last year that wasn't very cooperative but that year is over and so far this year, its been great.

I will leave you with one thing that is always stressed in our LD support group at school.

Homework is practice. If your child has not learned it at school, there is no way you are going to teach it to him at 6pm at night at the kitchen table after you've had a hard day and your child has too (remember, he's trying to keep up the pace with the non-LD kids). Its not worth fighting over. Let him do his best, set a time limit, then either write for him or just simply tell the teacher "Matt had a bad night last night, we just couldn't get all this done". The teacher will understand. The teacher doesn't want you and your child to be reduced to tears every night by homework. I've written for Matt, I've cut the number of problems (okay, do evens or odds) or whatever it takes to help him get through it. I usually ask the teacher's permission first, but they have all been very accomodating.

Enough for now. My hands are tired. Hope this helps a bit!

Lisa

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-25-2003
Fri, 12-12-2003 - 10:25pm

Hi,


Jumping in becaue I picked up on "eye thing"


Connie, do you think he may have some visual processing or visual motor issues (the muscles which control the eyes can be a bit out-of-sync sometimes)? Here is a good site which details eye functioning and also some things which may sometimes not work quite as Nature intended.


http://www.visionandlearning.com


Good luck


-Paula


-Paula

visit my blog at www.onesickmother.com

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