test questions and overwhelmed

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-29-2003
test questions and overwhelmed
7
Sat, 08-12-2006 - 10:34am

My Sweet baby girl has a mild hearing loss, and her last oae test oae's were present. We are going to attempted a behavoiral test the first week in oct. if she does not "test well" they want to do a sedadated abr mid oct. she will be 8 months

What can I expect from these test?

She has had 2 sleep abr's done. at 1 month and 2 months old.
She has hearing aids she likes them!!
It is all very overwhelming.
DD has some tightness in her back neck legs arms, most of it is corrected with lots of work so we have Early intervention for her ot needs and soon to start on her speech coming every other week doctors/audioligest every other week sign lauguage class weekly.

I have decided that since we are not going on a vacation That the babies and I will be taking a vaction from appointments we are only doing fun things for one week now we need to find a week!! We will go to the park, granmas house, the pool, or the lake do arts and crafts play outside take naps and have jammie day. and not be intrupted by oh its time for... oh we have to go... We will do what we want.

"Don't let school get in the way of your education"

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 08-12-2006 - 10:58am

Hi Saddie,

My ds had a sedated abr over 5 years ago when he was 3. We had suspected a hearing loss but he was hard to test in a sound booth since he was an active toddler at that time. I absolutely hated having him sedated but it was the only way to get an accurate test result. It did confirm his moderate/severe loss and he was aided shortly thereafter.

DS is now 8 and is doing fantastic w/ his aids. He's a very "normal" boy and has adapted well.

I know how frustrating all those tests can be. It's great that you're taking a little break from them!!

Keep us posted on the ABR.

And.....welcome to our new location : (

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-26-2005
Mon, 08-14-2006 - 10:13pm

What type of loss does your son have? Is it the nueral loss? Did they tell you that there was a chance the hearing aids might not work?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Mon, 08-14-2006 - 11:17pm
Sensorineural loss. Hearing aids generally help children with those losses. I had a student with a moderate/severe loss without aids and a mild/moderate loss with aids. He could mimic sounds, locate sounds (walk toward a sound),and understand spoken language in spanish and english, but was not verbal (for other reasons). We also used an object communication system and tactile sign language with him (as he was also totally blind).
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-29-2003
Tue, 08-15-2006 - 9:26pm
My dd Olivia hearing loss is sensorial (SP) loss. She does have hearing aids and LOVES them. Her whole face lit up the first time we put them on her. She leaves them alone for the most part she will tug at them when she is tired. and if its time for new molds she may tug at them a bit. She has a lot to say when she has them on and is quiter with out them. She is six months old and is on the move!! Belly Crawling and sitting with minamal support and trying to get from her belly to sitting!! To think just a few months ago she had tight muscles and was not moving much. She just wanted to be with me. What a great job Early intervention and follow through with her execises has done, not we are working on signs and language!!!
"Don't let school get in the way of your education"

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-23-2003
Thu, 08-17-2006 - 9:15am
My dd is 10 yo and has a mod-sev loss. She has been wearing hearing aids from the time she was 2. She loves her aids. The first thing that she does in the morning is to put her hearing aids on. There is a huge difference with and with out them. Her speech is great. She really dosen't have a "deaf voice". One of her biggest problems is that when people hear her talk, they assume that she can hear normally and forget to look at her when they talk to her or assume that she understood everything that is being said. Good luck with the aids and remember, they are not like glasses. When you put glasses on for the first time, you suddenly see everything clearly. Hearing aids take some time to get used to. There is an adjustment period.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 08-17-2006 - 3:23pm
We've experienced that also when people assume ds aids make him hear normally. That's one the biggest points I need to make at the beginning of the school year with teachers. His IEP reiterates the need to gain attention and talk face to face.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Thu, 08-17-2006 - 10:54pm

I have to agree... I had to berate a teacher at school once for standing over my kids and blowing his whistle to calm the cafeteria down. Of course, he stood over the kid with the moderate loss and I thought the poor kid was going to crawl under the table. This teacher "got it" that hearing aids didn't mean "perfect hearing," but failed to realize that some kids hear more than others and blowing a PE whistle in any kid's ear is just plain stupid! Of course, then there are those who think that because a student can talk, they can hear well. I had one student who absolutely understood no speech at all (her vision didn't allow for speechreading), but had learned and retained spoken language when she was younger (and her hearing loss was milder). She is 21 now and people still don't "get" that you have to sign or write (really, really big) to her for her to understand you...

And then there is the whole visual impairment thing... Kids with visual impairments who have low vision, even though they may wear glasses, still don't see as people with normal vision do -- and, just like with children with hearing aids, people don't understand why they didn't see them waiving from across the room. "Well, she is wearing her glasses!" Yeah, her glasses help her see the large print book 4 inches from her face, not someone waiving at her 20 feet away... And don't get me started when you have a student with low vision for whom glasses are of no benefit...

Now you have heard from both sides of my brain. *grin*