When are speech delays serious?

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
When are speech delays serious?
2
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 5:29pm

Two of my children have had speech delays, and both got ST in school with an IEP.  I was never that concerned about either of them, although my youngest hasn't advanced in progress as well as his older brother. 

If you are concerned about your child, but not sure if you should seek out help, here is a good resource: 

http://inhealth.cnn.com/speech-recovery-and-development-center/speech-delays-in-children-when-are-they-serious

If your child is in school, you should talk to their teacher to see if they can be evaluated.  You should also discuss your concerns with your pediatrician. One of my boys was able to get some ST when he was a toddler, we just had to go through an evaluation with the county.  

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 1:15am

Every state also has an Early Start program.  If you or your doctor feels that your child is not talking on target, you can have your child evaluated to see if she/he qualifies for services.  Just call your local school district's special education department to see who to contact.   Early Start is actually available for all disabilities from birth on up. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 1:12am

Speech delays are serious when the parent sees the need.   For my older son, he was 2 going on 3 and was angry that he couldn't say what he wanted.  His friend, with a birthday a week after his, wasn't angry, and was very happy.   My son needed therapy, the other boy turned 3.5 and started talking way beyond what my son could.

My younger son had issues with some sounds.  It is almost as though he can't hear the sounds.  He did speech for a year in kinder, in part because he also couldn't rhyme or tell initial sounds.   He met his goals, but...his speech is still a little hard to understand, and, he was diagnosed with dyslexia (age 8.)   At the advice of the tester, I am seeking speech therapy again because it appears that he has some auditory processing issues and isn't able to segment and tell the sounds correctly, in his speech or his reading.  

I have had therapists tell me that most of the kids who get speech therapy would outgrow the need if the parents would just let them do so.   That certainly was not the case with my older son, age 10 who will be doing therapy into middle school.   It also seems to not be the case with my younger son, who, although not as bad with his articulation, still has issues.