Eggs During Lent

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-02-2008
Eggs During Lent
13
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 9:09am
Can someone please clear this up for me? I was under the impression (from RCIA) that eggs and dairy during Lent are fine. Today, someone said to me that eggs are not. Which is correct?






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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-26-2000
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 11:39am

They are fine.

 


PJPIIadoration.jpg picture by Kimberly_sahm

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 12:47pm

They're fine. I'm allergic to fish, and no big fan of legumes, so I'm glad they're fine! In fact, I just had a cheese omelet for lunch.


Polly

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2009
Fri, 02-19-2010 - 3:39pm

It's been many many years since all animal products were not permitted.

http://catholicexchange.com/2009/03/05/116502/ this is a really good article about abstaining from meat (and not just during Lent)

Renee


Wife to Scott


Mom to: Madeleine, James, Abigail, Theresa & John


www.reneesuz.blogspot.com

Renee


Wife to Scott


Mom to: Madeleine, James,

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-26-1997
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 12:15am
We've always eaten eggs during the Fridays of lent.

 

Avatar for i_florida04
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-16-2004
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 2:12am

I'm thinking

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-03-2009
Sun, 02-21-2010 - 9:26am
...wow, I've not heard that eggs and dairy are unacceptable...my family has always abstained from what is largely defined as meat during the Fridays of Lent...we've not focused on the little intricacies of what is and isn't considered Lent...but, more on the denying oneself the over indulgences that we sometimes, well, indulge in...like dessert...or double helpings...

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2009
Mon, 02-22-2010 - 9:31pm

DUring another era, all animal products were to be abstained from.... but now it is only flesh....

we are permitted to eat eggs, milk, butter

Renee


Wife to Scott


Mom to: Madeleine, James, Abigail, Theresa & John


www.reneesuz.blogspot.com

Renee


Wife to Scott


Mom to: Madeleine, James,

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997
Wed, 02-24-2010 - 11:21am

Think "pescetarian," not "vegan." A pescetarian abstains only from animal *meat*, not animal *products*, and does eat seafood. And this only applies to Fridays of Lent and Ash Wednesday - the rest of the time we eat normally.

It's true that in the Middle Ages, Lent was a time of much stricter fasting and abstinence. I think the Orthodox churches observe much stricter rules for Lent than we do too (Sofia would know that).

I read an amusing anecdote in a book called "An Infinity of Little Hours," which tells about the lives of five young men who joined the Carthusian monastery in England in 1960. The Carthusians are vegetarians, but for some reason, moorhens were not considered meat, and someone gave a gift of moorhens to the monastery. The meat was cooked with a heavy white sauce, and the poor monks all got sick as dogs from this unaccustomed heavy food!

Kelly

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-02-2009
Wed, 02-24-2010 - 3:56pm

http://catholicexchange.com/2009/03/05/116502/#hide

this is an interesting article that answers the question of Are Catholic supposed to abstain from meat on all Fridays?

Renee


Wife to Scott


Mom to: Madeleine, James, Abigail, Theresa & John


www.reneesuz.blogspot.com

Renee


Wife to Scott


Mom to: Madeleine, James,

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997
Wed, 02-24-2010 - 5:05pm

The "short" answer is still that we're not required to abstain from meat on all Fridays. The "real" answer (to me) is more complex, though, because it deals with what kind of relationship we have (or want to have) with God.

To put it simply, though with the risk of oversimplifying and offending anyone (which I don't want to do): if I want a real relationship with the Trinity, I don't need to consult a checklist of rules any more than I need to consult a checklist of rules to figure out how to be in an authentic relationship with my husband, children, etc. Authentic relationship is not about about following rules so I do it "correctly," but about self-sacrifice and love. It follows that if I automatically sacrifice my wants and desires out of love for another human, I'd want to do so for God.

Rules are great in that they can help guide me back to the ways in which I can and should want to relate to God, including the "obligation" to go to mass on Sundays (though I'd really like to go every day) and the "obligation" to perform some kind of penance on Fridays (but wouldn't I want to do something self-sacrificing every day anyway?). I always get a little nervous when talking to people about "rules" and "obligations" because it always seems to me that those words miss the point of the *relationship*. This is something I correct DH about, since he grew up in a nominally Catholic family that rebelled against "rules" and missed the point about relationship entirely. He's agnostic, but he's learning. ;)

Anyway, I'm probably just saying similar things to what you were, and what the author of the article was saying, though maybe with a little different slant.

Kelly

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