My 4 y.o. is out of control!

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-17-2005
My 4 y.o. is out of control!
13
Thu, 07-17-2008 - 10:10pm

I feel like all I've been doing is yelling at him :(

 
 
 
 
 
 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Wed, 08-13-2008 - 1:19pm
i am pretty open on letting her choose what she wants to wear or eat (although she usually wants Popsicles for breakfast lol so i'll give her some other choices). Her triggers are when she's hungry or tired. Alot of times she just doesn't want to get dressed and it turns into a tantrum. Lately i've been telling her calmly (before it gets to that point) that as soon as she dressed she can go back to doing whatever she was doing, and letting her dress herself helps sometimes too. Doing her hair though is always a fight. She will not let me do it and it drives me crazy with her hair always in her face. i usually give her the count of 3 to do whatever it is i need her to do, then she gets time out or her movie turned off. Se rarely ever gives in with the hair and would rather go to her room but then i can't get my things done. There are other things that set her off but these are the everyday battles



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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Tue, 08-12-2008 - 5:51pm
The copy I have doesn't belong to me. It's a copy I borrowed from a friend who works in counseling, so I'm not able to share it. The full title and author is "Screamfree Parenting: The Revolutionary Approach to Raising Your Kids by Keeping Your Cool by Hal Edward Runkel. You might want to check to see if your library has a copy. Mine did but it had a very long wait list for it and they have multiple copies of it.

dawn200608.jpg picture by cariadlawn


iVillage Member
Registered: 08-17-2005
Tue, 08-12-2008 - 9:22am

Dawn~


You have given some absolutely fantastic advice! Thank you! I read your first post over a few times and I'm going to start implementing your suggestions immediately! I love the idea of "stepping out of the situation - it's not all about me"....

 
 
 
 
 
 
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Mon, 08-11-2008 - 8:33pm

It does sound like he is having trouble expressing his anger and frustration in a more appropriate manner.

How do you react when he starts screaming and yelling at you?

The therapist might be able to help both of you. You so you can help him work through his anger in a safe place. Him so he can come up with a better way to express himself. Not only will that help him get what he wants better but will also help him keep his friends.

My daughter Lindsay is very verbal except when she gets mad. Then she's just loud. Over the years we've been able to help her learn better ways then screaming at people when she's upset. Some days and some places she does a better job at keeping herself calm and in control. We've talked about how she can handle different situations that upset her -- other kids grabbing her stuff, people trying to help without asking if she wants help and what to do if she becomes frustrated by something she is trying to do. Because the therapist isn't directly involved in your lives, she or he might make that process a lot easier for you both.

dawn200608.jpg picture by cariadlawn


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Mon, 08-11-2008 - 8:23pm

Do you talk to her about her behavior when she isn't in trouble? Sit down with her when she isn't upset and you aren't upset. Tell her you love her. You know she can make the right choices. Let her know what your expectations are and what the consequences will be if she continues to act up. Let her know she'll get a reminder and then 3 warnings. The reminder would be given before she's done anything, right before a situation where in the past she has had trouble. Like if she throws fits when its time to leave the park. You remind her that when its time to leave the park she needs to come quietly or x will happen. Then when its time to leave and she starts to get upset give her the first warning, etc. Just make sure you follow through with what you told her the consequences would be.

I did want to ask you how control or say she has in other areas. Does she get to pick her own cereal? Does she pick out her own clothes? Give her limited choices when you can. Where you can't let her decide whether to do something or not, let her decide which order to do -- shoes on before or after your jacket? A lot of tantrums are about feeling frustrated and not having any say. When you start to give them more control when you can they stop fighting you on every little thing.

Getting a child to apologize when they don't want to is awful isn't it? Lindsay is usually very good about apologizing after she's calmed down but every now and then you can forget it. Dh told her once that she could stay in her room all day if she wouldn't tell her cousin she was sorry for taking his favorite car away. She was sorry but she was still angry about having gotten in trouble. She really doesn't like it when her dad gets upset with her. It doesn't stop her from doing things she knows not to. She gets more upset if he talks to her about it than if I do.

dawn200608.jpg picture by cariadlawn


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-21-2007
Mon, 08-11-2008 - 3:48pm
This was like reading my everyday life with my 4 1/2 year old son... The only difference is he's an only child and I'm a single mom.... His dad isn't in the picture... For the past few months my son has turned into the devils spawn I swear... Sounds so bad and heartbreaking to think of him like that but he's just so mean... He gets angry at the drop of a hat and will kick, scream, slap, punch, throw anything within arms reach (including his chairs for his table, books, shoes, etc.), stomp on my feet, and has gone so far as to tell me he's going to kill me if I don't do something... I NEVER use that phrase in front of him no matter what... We also live with my parents who are just as shocked over this behavior as I am... He can be a very loving and affectionate little boy who's got a heart of gold but when he get's mad it's like that sweet little boy just disappears... I've had conversations with my mother about this and asked her opinions on it... She taught pre-k for 20+ years and is going back to teach again this year after a 4 year break.... She says that she doesn't think it's an age thing but rather he doesn't know how to manage his anger at all... So with all of that being said, we are heading to theh pediatrician next Thursday (8/21) to discuss this matter.... I've been in therapy with a great woman for a little over a year now and she said that he might need to see a therapist with me so now I'll be seeing 2.... Well won't that be just cute... lol.... I'm worried about him because one of my brothers is bipolar, I suffer from depression and his father has an extremely violent temper... He's never been around my son and has never met him so I know there's no way my son could have picked it up from watching his father.... I just don't know what to do at this point... I feel like I'm constantly having some kind of battle with him over the smallest of things ex: picking up his flip flops.... I'm worried about him and I'm worried about me... I feel like if something doesn't change with him I'm going to lose my mind completely...
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-20-2008
Tue, 08-05-2008 - 6:41pm
i've never posted to this board but came over because my soon to be 4 yo is also out of control. Everything is a fight, she ignores me, she'll throw stuff or hit. I have a 4 month old who she always wants to be right in her face. I feel like i'm doing something wrong but reading this let me know maybe it's not me. We try time out and i just keep putting her back on the couch or step or bed whenever she gets up. I also make her apologize and that is like pulling teeth. I;m at my wits end. it's good to know i'm not along



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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-21-2008
Tue, 08-05-2008 - 2:11pm
I haven't been here for a long time, but boy can I relate!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2003
Mon, 07-21-2008 - 9:25pm

Thank you Julia.

You are right. It is very hard because they are our kids. We think of them as a reflection on us and our parenting and when they act up, we sometimes forget that they are their own people and they are not doing this to make us look bad but because of something that they are experiencing. I think when you are a teacher or a nanny you already have that distance and can easier see that it isn't about you at all. It is easier to see a solution if you aren't in the middle of it. When those buttons get pushed it is hard to pull yourself out of that emotional reaction and look at what is going on. Plus as my mom says "you get to send them home at the end of the school day." ;)

dawn200608.jpg picture by cariadlawn


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2006
Sun, 07-20-2008 - 3:23pm

Wow!! Great advice! I came upon this message board as I am feeling that my DD who just turned 4 at times drives me up the wall with her growing independence, very verbal nature and some back talk has started. I too have ended up raising my voice and then feel guilty about it afterwards. Your advice is great! I love the whole idea of taking yourself out of the situation, which I think is really hard to do, but I am going to try to be more conscious of that idea. Let's face it... our kids push our buttons because they are OUR kids and we want them to be the best that they can be. I love watching the Super Nanny and other nanny type shows but the one thing I always say is that it is so much easier for them to react calmly because it's not their kid. Just like in my first grade classroom. It is much easier for me to stay calm with a student that is giving me a hard time b/c they aren't my kid.

Thanks again for the great advice! I am going to try to put it to use right away!
Julia

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