When to get concerned?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-01-2005
When to get concerned?
25
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 12:54pm

Hi Ladies, especially mom's of older babies...

Maxim is 18 months today and the daycare had us do a short development screen for both 15 months and 18 months.

Photobucket


Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-23-2003
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 1:24pm
I wouldn't worry, especially if you feel he understands a lot. Teddy is almost 20 months and says, hallo (German), yes (German), no (German), Mama (for both Thomas and I LOL) and there (German) and that is pretty much it.

He makes lots of sounds, and baby babbles a lot but also will not always point to the right body part if you ask. He will however respond correctly if I ask if his diaper is dirty and by saying yes or no and then going to get a clean one and going to the bathroom if it is dirty. He does the same thing for questions like if he is hungry, tired, etc however if he is currently playing and doing something he likes more he will just ignore me or whoever is asking.

He also often answers with no when he means yes. And so far everyone we have talked to including our doctor says there is nothing to worry about. He is getting double the input of most children and he understands most of what is said to him and there is still lots of time for him to catch up.

Here in Germany people tend not to worry about speech issues until well over 2 years.
Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-27-2011
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 2:03pm
Well I am the opposite side of this. By 18 months Jensen was saying over 50 words, about 25 being quite frequently used. Weekly the words he uses most are "down" and "up", he can name all his facial features but his ears, and he says "belly" and "toes" and can point out his arms and legs and butt (lol), he can count to five on his fingers but only says "two" which I hear is really common. He can say "shoes" and knows what the correct words are. He frequently sings "Go Diego Go" very clearly. He says "mow mow" for cat and "woof woof" for dog, though he doesn't call the cat or dog. He says "thank you" whenever you hand him something, or he wants you to take something. He also says "pasta" and "pizza" and "cookie" and "canny" which is for candy, and "banana" (although he skips the middle na and says "bana"). He says "choo choo" when he says a plane and is CONSTANTLY asking "What's is that?" (just like that). He says "yes" and "no" and "mama" and "daddy". He says "go!" when the car accelerates or he says it with a question mark on the end when asking where something went. He also says "bobble" but not as much since we weaned him. He says "bear" and has a favorite blanket he calls "Bee". He can say the color "pink" but we are working on the other colors at least as far as recognition. If I ask him to bring me a certain one of his books he can correctly find and hand me the right book. (His favorites are Perfect Piggies and The Little Blue Truck).

However in saying all this I should tell you that while Jensen is pretty advanced as far as speech goes, he has always been pretty behind as far as physical things go. He didn't walk until he was a year and 2 weeks old, didn't crawl until he was 9 months old. He still has to hold our hand when going up the smallest steps and over all his motor function, while in the normal range, has always been on the slow end. I truly believe kids either learn the physical stuff first or the brain stuff first and never both at once.

Also I should mention me and Jensen spend quite a lot of our day reading and practicing almost every day. He is getting constant stimulation from me and the in laws just love how smart he is and when they are over they ask him to go over everything is well so it's like he is constantly being quizzed whenever around us. I really think repetition has a lot to do with why he is so verbal. We also watch very little TV around him so that he has to turn to us for entertainment. I do not at all think children's programs are bad, Diego has saved my life this pregnancy LOL! But I do think when they watch it, especially boys, do not feel inclined to repeat or respond to it. Jensen especially becomes extremely absorbed in it.

You are absolutely right that kids have big variables and I don't think for a second there is anything wrong with him. I think Jensen gets a lot of one on one time with me and this is how we spend our time. I think Maxim would respond just the same if he had the same kind of one on one time.

Powered by CGISpy.com
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-19-2007
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 2:50pm

Photobucket

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-11-2005
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 3:11pm
Speech is one of those tough ones. I would go with what you feel comfortable with, especially in a bilingual household. If he is still not talking at 2 I might be a bit more concerned. Since he understands everything and just isn't talking currently, if it doesn't worry you, then don't let his daycare worry you about it. I would keep an eye on it, and if your Mommy gut says to get it checked out then get it checked out then.

Desmond is in speech therapy for articulation issues, and he was actually talking some by 18 months, I think he had over 50 words at that point, so even if they are talking by that age, it doesn't mean they won't have issues later. Just follow your gut, most parents know if something is a real issue or just not quite at the expected developmental level.



Thank you for the sig Mary

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-23-2003
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 3:44pm
Sorry just have to say I don't think it has anything to do with one on one time and everything to do with being raised bilingually. There isn't anything wrong with having your doctor take a look but in one to two years when Maxim is speaking both English and French I am sure you will look back on this time and laugh:-) Many of my friends raising bi-lingual boys and some of my friends raising just German boys are dealing with the same stuff, and were shocked to hear that speech therapy is offered so young in the States ( personally I would love to see some long term studies to the benefits of such early intervention, as here it is seen as very odd which doesn't mean that it is a bad thing)
Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-27-2007
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 4:12pm

I agree that you should go with your gut and I've also heard that bilingual children often take longer to speak.

~Em~

Mommy to Nate and expecting a little girl Nov. 2012

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-13-2008
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 4:13pm
Teddy has one little friend who is raised bilingually and she had very few words to start with, and generally started slowly, but now at 2 1/2 is at a normal level in both languages.
I second what Ash said about it being down to Maxim being bilingual! Plus he's a boy and while not *all* boys are slower in speech development, most are.
Btw I would really make staff at daycare call him Maxim, not Max - I know it bugs me when people call Teddy "Ted" or "Theo" and of course he doesn't react to that, why would he?

Photobucket


iVillage Member
Registered: 11-01-2005
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 4:21pm
Thanks ladies for your input, I appreciate it! So far our attitude with his development has been, it will come as it comes as long as he isnt months and months behind (and he never has been yet).

He gets a ton of one to one time with us as much as we can because we both work. In the evenings, he gets an hour to play with us before dinner. He also gets his fun bath time with dad and a story before bedtime (alternating French and English stories). Unfortunatley during the week, this is all we can really do because of his bedtime. On the weekends, we spend pretty much every waking moment playing and interacting with him, not to mention all the stimulation and learning he gets in daycare. I also very strongly believe in free play that isnt interfered with by an adult and he gets a great deal of that too. I show him things, I demonstrate, I read...but he also gets to just explore and manipulate as he wants, that is how creativity is fostered.

Ash,thank you for sharing your experiences with your friends and their kids. I think the bilingualism is a factor for sure. I think some early intervention is good but I also think there is such a thing as too much too soon, and this part of the world is just so obsessed with some matters such as this...and I'm in the psych field and took 3 different development classes and 3 behavioral classes in my 6 years of school and I still believe there is just too much sometimes! I'll probably wait until he turns 2 before I start thinking about this as a serious matter. I spoke with a friend today who is a speech pathologist and happened to vent about this issue and she said, boys are slower at expressive language in general and not to worry about it right now.

Sarah, its true...they may be "on track" and then still have issues later.

Anyway, any other ladies have some input I'm happy to hear it :)

Photobucket


iVillage Member
Registered: 11-01-2005
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 4:28pm
Thanks Em, your experience makes me feel better!

Anna,
I know about the daycare thing...I've let it slide for now because I dont want to be really militant about his name (well in my head, I am but I havent been very direct in correcting people if they say Max..and not many do to be honest) but I think I'll ask them more firmly to call him Maxim. I never refer him to Max when I speak with them so you would think they would "catch on" right? Not so much I guess, lol.

Photobucket


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-15-2001
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 4:58pm
Ruby, my best friend is a speech pathologist, and she has told me many times that what she does in the "early intervention" cases is nothing more than play! She plays lots and lots of language-based games. Lots of the same thing over and over. While I don't think you have anything to worry about, it can't hurt to spend a little more time each day playing with words and sounds. Just have fun with your little guy and don't stress! Eventually the daycare people will be so impressed when Maxim is fluent in two languages!

As far as the one-on-one issue, I've read and heard others say that many kids in daycare actually speak sooner and develop more vocab sooner because they are exposed to so many different people and experiences on a regular bases. Truly I think it just comes down to the same old truth: every kid is different.

(And I'm with Anna...I would politely correct them on his name.)
Photobucket

Pages