Hepatitis B vaccine: Answers to your most-asked questions

  • The third dose should not be given to infants younger than 6 months of age.

Adolescents 11 to 15 years of age may need only two doses of hepatitis B vaccine, separated by 4-6 months. Ask your health care provider for details.

Hepatitis B vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

4. Some people should not get hepatitis B vaccine or should wait

In the rare event that you or your child has a serious reaction to a vaccine, a federal program has been created to help you pay for the care of those who People should not get hepatitis B vaccine if they have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to baker's yeast (the kind used for making bread) or to a previous dose of hepatitis B vaccine.

People who are moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting hepatitis B vaccine.

Ask your doctor or nurse for more information.

5. What are the risks from hepatitis B vaccine

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of hepatitis B vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

Getting hepatitis B vaccine is much safer than getting hepatitis B disease.

Most people who get hepatitis B vaccine do not have any problems with it.

Mild problems

  • soreness where the shot was given, lasting a day or two (up to 1 out of 11 children and adolescents, and about 1 out of 4 adults)
  • mild to moderate fever (up to 1 out of 14 children and adolescents and 1 out of 100 adults)
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