Holiday Gifts Your Kids Can Make


Flag Cookies for Culinary Creativity
1. Make a cookie template, about two-and-a-quarter by one-and-a-half inches, from waxed paper. Then roll out chilled sugar cookie dough (store-bought or your own recipe) to an eighth-inch thickness.

2. Using the template, cut out several rectangles. Place one on the cookie sheet. Set a Popsicle stick about a half-inch from the left edge of the rectangle (for the flagpole), then place another rectangle on top of the stick.

3. Firmly press together the edges to seal. Bake the cookies, then cool. Divide white icing into three cups. Add green food coloring to one, red to another and a mixture of four colors (red, green, blue and yellow) to the last one to make black (let your kids experiment).

4. Trim the edges of the cookie flags to make them straight, and decorate with lengthwise stripes of icing, starting with green on the bottom, then black in the middle and red on top.

Harvest Table Runner
A popular Kwanzaa decoration is the mkeka, a woven straw placemat that symbolizes tradition. Felt and ribbon may be used to weave your holiday runner.

1. Place a one-by-two-foot piece of green felt on a flat working surface so that the shorter edges are at the top and bottom.

2. Using fabric scissors, and adult should cut horizontal slits in the felt, leaving a one-inch border on each side.

3. Next cut red and black ribbon into 24-inch lengths, and weave them through the slits. Use fabric glue to attach the ribbon ends to the back of the felt.

4. Flip the runner over and fringe the ends.
  --Greer Carlisle (pswngreer)

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