Should twins be in the same class?

Should I have my twins in separate classes or keep them together in the same class?

Question:

Thank you for your letter. While your question is put very simply, the answer may be a bit more complicated and, ultimately, it will have to come from you. However, we can discuss the advantages of each scenario so you can make the choice that you feel is best for your family.

Twins are an interesting phenomenon, particularly for people who aren't twins themselves. For adults and children alike, twins hold a certain mystique. Do twins really have their own language? Are twins closer to each other than other siblings? Can twins sense things about each other? These are fascinating questions for people who do not have firsthand knowledge of being a twin or living with twins.

Because twins are so special, they receive a lot of attention, as I am sure you have experienced yourself. There probably isn't any way around that, but knowing that your children will have to deal with other people's fascination with them as they grow up may help guide you in your decision to have them in the same class or separate classes in elementary school.

There are advantages to having the children in the same class. For example, homework assignments, classroom expectations and curriculum will be essentially the same. They will take the same field trips and have assignments due on the same days. This would simplify things for you, and may even give the kids the opportunity to work together and help each other with their school work.

In addition to the logistics, having the twins in the same class would allow them to be together. If they have a very strong, close relationship, it may be advantageous for them to be in the same class.

Placing the twins in separate classes has advantages, too. While the children may not be on the same page in every textbook, they will probably cover much of the same material throughout the year and still be able to help each other with assignments. They may not go on the same field trips, but separate classes would give you the opportunity to spend time with each child separately if you were to chaperone.

Most of all, having the children in separate classrooms allows them to grow as individuals, without having the twin around every moment of the day. They will make different friends in their respective classrooms, while developing shared friendships on the playground. And, they can still see each other at lunch and at recess, while having space from one another during class time.

Before making your final decision, talk with other parents of twins. Find out about their experiences and ask for impressions of their children's classroom placements. If you don't know of any parents of twins or multiples in your area, try visiting the Bulletin Boards here at ParentsPlace.com. In addition to reading posts written by others, you can also post your concern and ask for feedback from other parents.

For more immediate input, attend one of the topic chats in the Special Events Chat Room for parents of multiples and pose your question to them. People who have been in this situation are going to be your most valuable resource.

Ultimately, the final decision should be based on your children. Consider their personalities carefully, factoring in their individual strengths and weaknesses. If you feel strongly that your children should be together, keep them together. If it doesn't work out, you can always make a change. If you really want to separate them, request separate classes. Remember, you can always change that if it doesn't work out.

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