When sex hurts during pregnancy: 6 ways to begin enjoying lovemaking again

I am two months pregnant and had always enjoyed making love. I'm not really in the mood and sex has become uncomfortable. Is this normal?

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ABOUT THE EXPERT

Peg Plumbo CNM

Peg Plumbo has been a certified nurse-midwife (CNM) since 1976. She has assisted at over 1,000 births and currently teaches in the... Read more

1. Remember that sex drive waxes and wanes. It is not uncommon for women's sex drive to decrease during pregnancy. During the first trimester, physical symptoms, such as nausea, fatigue, breast tenderness and cramping may interfere with desire. Emotionally, a woman may feel less than desirable or her thoughts may turn inward toward the baby and less toward her own pleasure. You may find that this situation improves during the second trimester, when symptoms of pregnancy become less troublesome.

2. Let go of the fear. Even though couples know intellectually that intercourse under most circumstances will not harm the pregnancy or the baby, women and men both may have secret fears of being so close to the developing embryo. Thoughts like this can definitely impact your pleasure.

3. Lubricate, lubricate, lubricate. Intercourse may be uncomfortable for some women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Vaginal tissues may become more easily irritated during pregnancy and long sessions of lovemaking or repeat episodes may no longer be comfortable. Additional lubrication may be helpful and make sex enjoyable again. AstroGlide or Slippery Stuff are non-irritating lubricants. You can visit the AstroGlide site to get a free sample.

4. Try something new. It can be fun to try some new positions, which cause less irritation. Oral or manual stimulation can provide a fun alternative to intercourse that is safe during pregnancy. On another positive note, the hormones of pregnancy cause increased blood flow to the genitals. This can make it easier to achieve orgasm.

5. Enjoy contraceptive-free sex. Many couples discover lovemaking, free from condoms, diaphragms and gels, to be especially liberating and more fun. It's a great time to take advantage of spontaneous lovemaking.

6. Talk with your care provider. Be sure to discuss your concerns with your care provider, as there may be a vaginal infection (yeast or another infection), which could possibly be causing your discomfort.

 

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