Your 10-Week-Old

What’s new this week?
Your Baby

Your baby is pulling out some fun new moves right about now. A few weeks ago, she discovered her hands. Now, she's slowly learning how to put them to work. At points, she can bring her hands together and even reach for objects. But it's... Read more

Your Life

At this point, you may be thinking about going back to work soon. Take comfort in the fact that you're not alone: 50 percent of new moms return to work before their babies are three-months-old. If you're breastfeeding and plan to continue, know that... Read more

Moms Like Me

Baby Acne: My baby's acne is clearing up a bit but my pediatrician said it's COMPLETELY normal. And it's normal for them to have it other places besides their face, too. Nellie's got some on her shoulders, neck, and back. Try wiping baby's face down... Read more

Your 10-Week-Old: Your Baby

Your baby is pulling out some fun new moves right about now. A few weeks ago, she discovered her hands. Now, she's slowly learning how to put them to work. At points, she can bring her hands together and even reach for objects. But it's definitely a case of trial and error. Sometimes she makes contact with the object of her desire; other times she doesn't. Either way, she's refining her eye-hand coordination. She's also learning that she can use her hands to make things happen, and that's an exciting discovery!

Her visual skills are also improving. She can now track objects a full 180 degrees. Try holding a toy in front of your face and moving it back and forth across her line of vision. She'll get to exercise her eyes, and you'll get to watch her sweet look of intense concentration.

Another change you might notice this week: fewer poopy diapers. As your baby matures, her digestive system also matures. By ten weeks, your baby's body is now able to absorb most of the nutrients from each feeding, so there's less waste. It's entirely normal for a breastfed baby to go as many as ten days without a BM. Formula-fed babies typically still poop every day or so.

Your Life

At this point, you may be thinking about going back to work soon. Take comfort in the fact that you're not alone: 50 percent of new moms return to work before their babies are three-months-old. If you're breastfeeding and plan to continue, know that it will be a challenge as you and baby adjust to the new routine. But you can do it: The latest stats show that 34% of moms exclusively breastfeed after returning to work. Turn the odds of success in your favor by coming up with a plan, purchasing the right accessories for pumping and properly storing milk, and figuring out where and when you'll be able to pump at work. (You'll need to pump once for every missed feeding.) Also, know that many breastfed babies adopt a reverse-cycle nursing pattern once Mom returns to work, nursing more when Mom is home and taking very little while she's away.

Dads are an important part of the breastfeeding equation. They can bring you the baby in the middle of the night and—most importantly—give you the courage and strength to continue nursing when you feel discouraged. Dads can also run interference with nosy family members or friends. Your partner is an important part of your back-to-work support system, so be specific about what you need from him. And when he takes the time to clean up after supper, thank him for loading the dishwasher instead of pointing out that he forgot to wipe off the stove.

Speaking of relationships, it's worth pointing out that a baby has a way of impacting the whole family—for good and sometimes, not so good. Take your parents or in-laws. Although it can be annoying to hear your mother or mother-in-law repeatedly say that she doesn't understand why your baby can't sleep face-down, it's important to remember one thing: She cares about your child too. Rather than get defensive, gently explain why you're doing what you're doing, and then smile as you hand your new baby to his Grandma to hold.

Moms Like Me

Baby Acne: My baby's acne is clearing up a bit but my pediatrician said it's COMPLETELY normal. And it's normal for them to have it other places besides their face, too. Nellie's got some on her shoulders, neck, and back. Try wiping baby's face down with a warm wet wash cloth once a day and patting it dry. That's about all you can do! —karmapearl

What Moms Are Talking About

My daughter is 2-1/2 months old. I put her in her bouncer while I’m cleaning the kitchen or cooking. While I talk to her, she plays with the toy bar on the bouncer. We also have a play mat with toys that I lay her on. We try for tummy time, but she doesn't like that at all! While I change her diaper or dress her we play little piggies with her feet and blow raspberries on her tummy. We’ve even taught her to blow raspberries at us! —stanggurl85 Read More

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