Your 19-Week-Old

Married Sex

As much as you would like to keep your parenting life and sex life as far apart as possible, there will be times when they sometimes awkwardly cross paths. We talked to the experts to get the rules on what's appropriate and what's not.

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Your Baby

Remember when your baby was a sweet, still little bundle? Not anymore! Most 19-week-olds are bundles of energy. By now, your baby has probably mastered the art of rolling over. If not, give him a little more time on the floor. You’ll be... Read more

Your Life

Probably one of the most annoying parts of parenthood is the oodles of unsolicited advice. As you’ve probably learned by now, babies attract attention—and for some reason, everyone who has ever had a baby (or not!) feels qualified to... Read more

Moms Like Me

I had a hard time with the idea of what to do during the night when he wakes up and ultimately decided to do what felt right- and that was to feed him. (My mom actually gave me that advice while visiting a few weeks ago, Yay Mom...) I will offer him... Read more

Your 19-Week-Old: Your Baby

Remember when your baby was a sweet, still little bundle? Not anymore! Most 19-week-olds are bundles of energy. By now, your baby has probably mastered the art of rolling over. If not, give him a little more time on the floor. You’ll be surprised at how quickly he figures it out! He also loves to test his legs. Most babies can now bear weight on their legs, an important pre-requisite to learning how to walk. You might be tempted to buy a baby walker, but beware: Baby walkers are dangerous and may inhibit your child’s development Besides, recent research has found absolutely no benefit to the use of baby walkers. (Parents used to believe that walkers helped their children learn to walk, but newer studies suggest that infant walkers may actually delay walking.) If your baby absolutely must be upright but out of your arms, try a safer alternative, such as a stationary activity seat. Whenever possible, spend time interacting with your baby instead of relying on gadgets and gear to entertain her. So plop her in the activity seat and empty that dishwasher, but don’t tack on dinner prep or cleaning out the fridge all in one shot. Why? Because babies learn best through human interaction. Thanks to all the one-on-one time you’ve been spending with baby, by now she can probably recognize her name. She’ll also turn toward the sound of a familiar voice. And she knows enough about what is normal and expected that the unexpected can make her giggle. Test it out: Hide under her blankie. Make silly faces. Talk in a funny voice.

Your Life

Probably one of the most annoying parts of parenthood is the oodles of unsolicited advice. As you’ve probably learned by now, babies attract attention—and for some reason, everyone who has ever had a baby (or not!) feels qualified to tell you exactly how to raise yours. The advice runs the gamut: Feed the baby on a schedule. Watch your baby, not the clock. Put another sweater on her; she’s cold. And of course, the advice isn’t just restricted to the care of your baby. Plenty of people are willing to tell you how to live your life, too: Going back to work is selfish. Staying home is a waste of your education. Know this: You are the number-one authority when it comes to your baby and life. Only you (and your partner) know what’s best for your baby and your family. You set the priorities for your life, and those priorities—plus your baby’s temperament—will determine the choices you make. What worked for your easy-going neighbors may not work at all in your extremely active household. Take comfort in the fact that babies have been raised in all different manners, all around the world, for hundreds of thousands of years. No one has cornered the market on successful child rearing. So trust your instincts. Seek advice when necessary, but discard that the stuff that doesn’t work for you. Together, you and your partner will figure out a parenting—and lifestyle—that meets your family’s needs.

Moms Like Me

I had a hard time with the idea of what to do during the night when he wakes up and ultimately decided to do what felt right- and that was to feed him. (My mom actually gave me that advice while visiting a few weeks ago, Yay Mom...) I will offer him his soothy blanket and if that doesn't work I feed him. I am just trying to go with the flow and not worry about nighttime wakings. —zachsmomg2005

What Moms Are Talking About

One way that we've been able to save a lot of money is by buying the vast majority of his clothes at consignment shops and consignment sales. Depending on where you shop their little clothes can get so expensive, and I found some GREAT deals at consignment shops, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with the clothes! —jrmiller131  Read More

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