Your 21-Week-Old

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Your Baby

Your baby is becoming quite the little mimic! Ever notice his mouth moving as he watches you talk? That's because he understands that moving your mouth creates different sounds and he wants to try it out. All of baby's experimenting may soon lead... Read more

Your Life

After nine months of passing up alcohol, most moms are more than ready for a glass of wine or a bottle of beer. If you're breastfeeding, you've probably wondered: how much is too much? Is it ever safe to breastfeed your baby after a night of... Read more

Moms Like Me

Traveling with Baby: I don't check in the carseat at the counter—you have to sign a form saying that they're not liable if it gets banged up. I gate check so that it spends the minimal time out of sight and has the least handling by... Read more

Your 21-Week-Old: Your Baby

Your baby is becoming quite the little mimic! Ever notice his mouth moving as he watches you talk? That's because he understands that moving your mouth creates different sounds and he wants to try it out. All of baby's experimenting may soon lead to some new sounds. Any day now, he may add some consonants to his vowel-heavy repertoire. Dadadada and babababa are right around the corner! (Sorry, Moms – babies don't develop the m sound until a little later.) Your baby is also learning a lot about sound right now. He's taking what he already knows about cause and effect and factoring in sound. Now, if he's fussing in his crib, but hears you coming from the bathroom, he may quiet down. He's figured out that the sounds of your footsteps and voice, coming nearer, mean that you'll soon show up at his bedside. Right now, it's not at all unusual for babies to catch their first cold or develop an ear infection. It can be scary seeing your child sick. But most childhood illnesses are relatively mild and short lived. Diagnosing a cold is pretty simple: look for a runny nose and mild cough. Ear infections can be trickier to pinpoint. Most babies will be fussy or feverish with an ear infection, they might also pull on the infected ear, and the ear might look red. But some babies exhibit almost no symptoms, so call your pediatrician if you can't figure out why your baby is out of sorts. In the mean time, keep your baby comfortable. For a feverish baby, place a cool cloth on her forehead. Give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to ease ear pain while decreasing fever. Run a cool-mist humidifier in her bedroom during naps and at night to help a stuffed up nose. Read up on alternative treatments before trying them. For instance, some parents swear by chiropractic care for ear infections, while others are skeptical of any alternative treatments.

Your Life

After nine months of passing up alcohol, most moms are more than ready for a glass of wine or a bottle of beer. If you're breastfeeding, you've probably wondered: how much is too much? Is it ever safe to breastfeed your baby after a night of drinking? The short answer is yes—to a point. Clearly, if you've had too much, it's not a good idea to nurse your infant. But if you only had one drink with dinner, it's probably OK. To be absolutely safe, wait two to three hours after drinking before feeding your baby, or pump and dump the alcohol-affected milk and give your baby a bottle instead. Some moms today even drink while caring for their babies—three-martini playdate, anyone? While the issue is controversial (some say caregivers should never drink; others argue that the occasional cocktail is no big deal), common sense should prevail. Never, ever drink and drive. Don't sleep with your baby after you've been drinking; recent research reveals an increased risk of death for babies who co-sleep with a parent who's been drinking. And if you—or your friends—have any doubts at all about your ability to safely care for your baby after drinking, find a safe adult to watch your child.

Moms Like Me

Traveling with Baby: I don't check in the carseat at the counter—you have to sign a form saying that they're not liable if it gets banged up. I gate check so that it spends the minimal time out of sight and has the least handling by strangers. —loramz

What Moms Are Talking About

Not Sitting Up: The SB's with older siblings sometimes don't have as much motivation because the big kids haul them around like luggage.  Savannah loves when the big kids have friends over because that is just another set of arms to carry her around. —thecrew08  Read More

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