Your 23-Week-Old

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Your Baby

Is your baby sitting yet? If not, she will be soon. Most babies are able to sit independently around six months, but don't worry if yours learns a little later. Sitting, like all developmental milestones, happens according to your baby's... Read more

Your Life

If you haven't already, make sure your baby has a safe place to explore. A carpeted area is, of course, better for sitting practice than tile floor; if your baby falls, she's less likely to bust her head open. Watch out for small objects on the... Read more

Moms Like Me

Shoes at a young age are just decoration really...it's all for show if you ask me. They don't need them. I think they are cute, but really most of the time they are in their socks or sleepers anyway. When they start to walk they can have some shoes... Read more

Your 23-Week-Old: Your Baby

Is your baby sitting yet? If not, she will be soon. Most babies are able to sit independently around six months, but don't worry if yours learns a little later. Sitting, like all developmental milestones, happens according to your baby's schedule, not a calendar.

You can encourage your baby by placing her in a sitting position on the floor and then gradually releasing your hands. Stay close by, because she'll probably tilt to one side sooner or later. You may also notice your baby using her hands to prop herself up in a sitting position. As she gets stronger (and as her natural curiosity causes her to seek out other toys with her hands), she'll sit upright, first using one hand as a prop, then independently.

Go ahead and schedule your baby's six-month check-up. Her physician will want to assess her growth and development—and administer the third round of immunizations. Something to keep in mind: Many babies develop a fear of strangers right about now, so don't be surprised if your little one shrieks as soon as the doctor enters the room. Just keep her your lap and stay calm. Most pediatricians are more than happy to conduct the bulk of the exam with your baby safely seated on your lap. And since babies take their emotional cues from their caregivers, staying calm lets your baby know that the doc is all right after all.

Your Life

If you haven't already, make sure your baby has a safe place to explore. A carpeted area is, of course, better for sitting practice than tile floor; if your baby falls, she's less likely to bust her head open. Watch out for small objects on the floor as well. Your baby can grasp things, and as you've no doubt figured out by now, everything ends up in her mouth!

Being a mom, however, is more than just babyproofing. It's easy to get caught up in work and parenting; after all, your baby and your job take up most of your waking hours. But it's important to schedule some time with your friends as well. Friends—especially other mom friends—keep you sane and provide the kind of real-world, in-the-trenches advice that’s so hard to find anywhere else.

Hanging with friends also increases your emotional energy and helps you reconnect with the woman inside the mom. Yes, you're a mom—but you're also still a person with thoughts, dreams, desires and wishes. Spending just one afternoon a month in the company of old friends, discussing politics or scrapbooking, can help you feel like a person again, instead of "just" a mom.

Ideally, your friend circle should include a mix of old and new friends. Your pre-baby friends may not fully understand your post-baby life, unless they have children of their own. They do, however, know you. Post-baby friends can be found everywhere. As you've probably already found out, babies are great icebreakers. Chat it up with another mom at the park; if you hit it off, make plans to meet sometime. Other places to make mom friends are at baby-and-me classes, the library, church, and online.

Moms Like Me

Shoes at a young age are just decoration really...it's all for show if you ask me. They don't need them. I think they are cute, but really most of the time they are in their socks or sleepers anyway. When they start to walk they can have some shoes for outside or something, but many will argue that good ol' bare feet are best for new walkers! —baby-sass

What Moms Are Talking About

Try to take some time out of all of the craziness—even if it's just 10 minutes here or there—to have a little YOU time. Paint your nails, have a cup of tea or a bubble bath as pp mentioned, use some nice lotion, do the cucumber eye thing, anything that gives you a mini-refresher and settles your heart rate for a bit. And if possible, try to sneak some time in with dh every week (which sounds like it would be difficult with your schedules). I find that it's really necessary in keeping the family together. Even if it's just a short movie, a long talk, a quick appetizer shared at a restaurant or at home - together time is always beneficial!! —triciater Read More

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