Your 34-Week-Old

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Your Baby

Does your little one bury his head in your shoulder when strangers chat you up at the grocery store? Many babies do, especially as they approach the nine-month mark. In a lot of ways, their newfound fear is a product of their growing awareness. ... Read more

Your Life

To wean or not to wean, that is the question.A lot of moms think about weaning around now, but if breastfeeding is going well, there's no reason to stop. Yes, your baby has some teeth and yes, he's eating table food, but breastmilk continues to be... Read more

Moms Like Me

After Christmas, I realized we had way too much stuff, so I divided up her toys and put half of them in the guest closet. I figure I'll rotate them out every few weeks for variety.... Read more

Your 34-Week-Old: Your Baby

Does your little one bury his head in your shoulder when strangers chat you up at the grocery store? Many babies do, especially as they approach the nine-month mark. In a lot of ways, their newfound fear is a product of their growing awareness. Your child now clearly recognizes the difference between you and "others." He also knows that you stand for safety and security. Those other people? He's not so sure!

While it can be frustrating or embarrassing to watch your child shy away from perfectly nice people (often including grandparents), your best bet is to follow your child's lead. Let him stay close while you talk to the other person. Don't push him to say hello or encourage him to interact in any way. Just go on about your business. When he sees that you like and trust the other person, he'll likely come around.

Of course, a lot of well-meaning adults will attempt to hurry the friendship. They might reach for your baby or try to tickle him. Don't hesitate to let them know that your baby is feeling a little uncomfortable at the moment. Put some distance between them and your baby by holding your baby to the other side. When he's ready, he'll say hello.

Physically, your baby may be ready to stand. The only problem? He doesn't know how to get down yet! As frustrating as this stage is for you—and believe us, "rescuing" your baby from the standing position several times a day gets old after while—think how your baby must feel! Whenever possible, surround him with softness, just in case he tumbles down. You don't have to be fanatic about it; following him with pillows is a bit much! (And don't even think of wrapping him in bubble wrap!) Bumps and bruises are part of the process. If (when!) he falls, put on a happy face and simply say, "Oh-oh!" or "Oops!" Remember, your baby picks up on your moods, so if you panic, he'll panic too.

For fun, try placing your baby on the floor near a full-length mirror. He'll be fascinated by his reflection and try to pull up. He may even smile, wave or talk to the baby in the mirror! And the best part is that he's beginning to figure it out. Soon, he'll notice that when he moves his hand, the other baby moves too—in the exact same way. When that happens, it's time to check off another intellectual milestone: your baby recognizes his own reflection!

Your Life

To wean or not to wean, that is the question.

A lot of moms think about weaning around now, but if breastfeeding is going well, there's no reason to stop. Yes, your baby has some teeth and yes, he's eating table food, but breastmilk continues to be an excellent source of nourishment. In fact, at this point, 75% of his nourishment still comes from breastmilk or formula.

Don't pay attention to those who ask, "He"s still nursing?" or, more bluntly, "How much longer are you going to breastfeed?" The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a full year of breastfeeding (or longer). There is nothing abnormal about nursing an eight-month-old baby, even though some people imply otherwise.

But if you're not enjoying breastfeeding—if it's become more of a hassle than a joy—it may be time to call it quits. It can be hard to find time to pump at work, and for many moms, the trouble just isn't worth it after awhile.

If you decide to wean your baby, drop one feeding at a time, ideally a lesser-important feeding. (Usually the bedtime nursing is the last to go.) Build more cuddle time into your day, to ease baby's transition. Offer plenty of healthy foods and snacks. It's still too early for cow's milk, but not too early for the cup. Fill the cup with formula and watch your baby go. It may take a couple tries, but he'll get the hang of it sooner rather than later.

Moms Like Me

After Christmas, I realized we had way too much stuff, so I divided up her toys and put half of them in the guest closet. I figure I'll rotate them out every few weeks for variety. —ladybug_jenn

What Moms Are Talking About

weaning: I thought it was harder on me than on Elizabeth. She didn't care one bit. But I cried a lot about it for a couple days. I was surprised at what an emotional attachment I had to it. I was "our" thing ya know - something no one else in the whole world could do. —kitty252008   Read More

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