Your 50-Week-Old

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Your Baby

Have you noticed your baby taking care of a doll or stuffed animal? If so, congratulate yourself! Babies learn nurturing behavior from their caregivers, so if your baby gently pats her stuffed dog on the back to reassure him after he falls to the... Read more

Your Life

Weaning can be tough on moms.  Physically, you’ll probably be OK; most babies are nursing relatively infrequently by the time they’re a year old anyway.  The emotional experience, though, can surprise moms.  One minute you... Read more

Moms Like Me

Sleep without the bottle: He would never wake up and roll over and go back to sleep, everytime he woke up he wanted a bottle before he would go back to sleep, and it got to a point where i knew it wasn't out of hunger or thirst but out of habit and... Read more

Your 50-Week-Old: Your Baby

Have you noticed your baby taking care of a doll or stuffed animal? If so, congratulate yourself! Babies learn nurturing behavior from their caregivers, so if your baby gently pats her stuffed dog on the back to reassure him after he falls to the floor, you can be sure she learned from you. Babies this age are excellent mimics, and they're also developing a sense of empathy. Ever notice the distressed look that crosses your baby's face when she hears another baby cry? That’s because she recognizes a cry as a plea for help. Now, she may even toddle over and attempt to comfort the other baby. Sweet, huh? After months of constant, steady weight gain, your little one may begin thinning out. Some of it is simple growth and development. Now that she’s getting older, you baby is taking on the shape of a toddler, not an infant. She’s developing her leg muscles; those pudgy baby thighs are a thing of the past! Some babies even lose a little weight around the 12-month mark. That's because almost-one-year-olds are so incredibly busy! They're constantly moving (do you know any sedentary toddlers?) and reluctant to sit and eat. Give your child plenty of chances to graze during the day—experts say up to six small, nutritious meals a day may be healthier than three large ones anyway—but don’t stress out if the scales show a slight dip this month. She’ll regain it soon enough. If your baby is still nursing, feel free to continue. Breastmilk remains an excellent source of nutrition6 for your baby. (And a good thing for moms as well. Did you know that extended breastfeeding decreases your risk of breast cancer?) When the time comes, drop just one breastfeeding at a time and give your baby and body plenty of time to adjust before dropping another feeding. Most physicians don’t recommend cow's milk until after the first year, but if you're this close, talk to your doctor, who may give you the green light to offer whole milk in a sippy cup.

Your Life

Weaning can be tough on moms.  Physically, you’ll probably be OK; most babies are nursing relatively infrequently by the time they’re a year old anyway.  The emotional experience, though, can surprise moms.  One minute you may feel happy and content; the next, overwhelmed with sadness.

Blame the hormones.  Breastfeeding is a hormone-dependent process, so when you stop breastfeeding, your body goes through a period of hormonal upheaval.  Oxytocin, the hormone that stimulates the release of breastmilk, is also a feel-good hormone that helps moms relax.  And when you have a toddling terror in the house, a couple moments of hormonally-induced relaxation is pure bliss!

Take away the oxytocin – and add a couple more moments of baby chasing – and you’re bound to feel more stressed.  Weaning moms may also experience depression, irritability and mood swings.  For most women, these feelings are relatively mild.  If your feelings seem more intense or persistent, contact your doctor.  Some women experience post-weaning depression, similar to post-partum depression, and may require medical treatment.

Breastfeeding is an extraordinarily special experience, one that drew you and your baby close, many times a day.  Weaning is an undeniable admission that your child is growing – and doesn’t need you in the same ways anymore.  It’s only natural to feel a little bit sad.  But your baby isn’t going anywhere soon.  Your relationship is changing, but that doesn’t make it any less special. 
 

Moms Like Me

Sleep without the bottle: He would never wake up and roll over and go back to sleep, everytime he woke up he wanted a bottle before he would go back to sleep, and it got to a point where i knew it wasn't out of hunger or thirst but out of habit and not knowing how to self soothe So i started laying him down turning on his music and giving him his blanket and a sippy cup of water, i hold the sippy cup and he sips out of it while he rubs his blanket on his face and i shhhshhh (or however you wanna spell it) and rub his head. When he's really relaxed I tip toe out of his room and don't close the door and i leave the hall light on,  it seems to really freak him out when i close his door. -nikkibee2008 
 

What Moms Are Talking About

Rhiannon has taken unaided steps before but it didn't seem like she did it on purpose. She actually seemed pretty shocked that she did it lol. This week however she is just ready to go and today she walked across the living room  on her own without falling. It was so cute she was concetraiting so hard and got so happy when we clapped for her.  - cherri_blossom     Read More

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