Your 51-Week-Old

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Your Baby

Baby not walking yet? No big deal! Sure, it's great fun to watch a baby toddle around at his birthday party, but many babies don't walk until sometime in the second year—some not until 17 or 18 months! There's not much you can do to hurry... Read more

Your Life

For most of the first year, you nurtured your baby. You held him, fed him, changed him and helped him do just about everything he wanted to do. You'll never stop nurturing your baby (not even when he's 17!), but as your baby enters his second... Read more

Moms Like Me

We took DS to haircuttery for his first cut - they were great with him and were able to distract him while I held him. Getting him used to the barber young was good - now he sits perfectly still and actually enjoys going for a haircut. ... Read more

Your 51-Week-Old: Your Baby

Baby not walking yet? No big deal! Sure, it's great fun to watch a baby toddle around at his birthday party, but many babies don't walk until sometime in the second year—some not until 17 or 18 months! There's not much you can do to hurry up the process; babies' physical development occurs on their timetables, not yours. Holding his arms and walking with him won’t help, unless he's the one initiating the activity. Just give your baby plenty of space and time to explore. He'll figure it out Some babies pick up some, uh, undesirable habits around now. Biting, hitting and toy throwing all are common on the toddler social scene. That's because babies lack verbal skills and self-control. Your baby doesn't know how to say to another toddler, "Excuse me, can I please play with that toy when you're done?" All your baby knows is that someone else has a neat toy—and he wants it! Now! Twelve-month old babies tend to bite, hit or throw things when they're frustrated. If the other child refuses to hand over the boy, your baby may haul off and hit (or bite) him. As horrified as you may be, try to remember that your baby's actions aren't motivated by malice. He simply doesn't have another way of expressing himself. That doesn't mean you should excuse his behavior. Help him see the results of his actions ("See? That baby is crying. He's sad because you hit him.") Apologize to the other baby and parent and encourage your child to apologize as well. (He might not be able to say "sorry," but he may hang his head or give the offended child a hug.) Expect to repeat these steps over and over and over again in the coming months. Teaching proper behavior is definitely a work in progress! Temper tantrums may also appear around this time. If your baby throws himself on the floor, screaming and kicking 'til his face turns red, when you deny his request for a cookie 10 minutes before supper, ignore him. Make sure he's safe—pull back the chair he's about to bump his head on, for instance—and keep a discrete eye on him, but refuse to interact until he calms down. When he does, give him plenty of hugs and reassurance. Tantrums are scary for little ones too! As your baby's language skills develop, the number of hitting and biting episodes (and temper tantrums!) will decrease.

Your Life

For most of the first year, you nurtured your baby. You held him, fed him, changed him and helped him do just about everything he wanted to do. You'll never stop nurturing your baby (not even when he's 17!), but as your baby enters his second year, your focus shifts to helping him interact in the world. A big part of that process? Discipline. You've been disciplining your baby—setting boundaries and limits—for months now. But disciplining a toddler is a whole new ball game! Toddlers are willful, independent humans who lack verbal skills. They're still developing the ability to predict future occurrences based on the past. And they live to test limits! You're going to be challenged in the coming year, no doubt. So make time now to brush up on the basics of discipline. Take a parenting class; many hospitals or outreach centers offer classes such as, "Love and Limits" or "1-2-3 Magic." Read some books about discipline; Dr. Sears' The Discipline Book is aimed a parents of children from birth to age 10. Talk to experienced parents as well—especially parents of older, well-mannered children. What techniques did they use? How did they parent? Remember that effective discipline is child-specific; what worked for your neighbor's laid-back daughter may not work for your highly sensitive son. It will take time and lots of experimentation before you figure out what works best for your child.

Moms Like Me

We took DS to haircuttery for his first cut - they were great with him and were able to distract him while I held him. Getting him used to the barber young was good - now he sits perfectly still and actually enjoys going for a haircut. —mom2hareball

What Moms Are Talking About

On the other hand: I'd never expected bf'ing working so good for us. I am glad that for a year I could nurse her, ups and downs of supply issues, torn and bleedy nipples and three bouts with mastitis nonwithstanding. It worked, and I think it was the right decision to allow Marit to self-wean. Her first birthday is on saturday, and she's really a big girl already! :-) —ivy_jordis Read More

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